04-13-2014Enter The Void (2009)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1191111/
Enter The Void is Gaspar Noé’s most colourful yet darkest and freakiest movie yet. It shares with his other movies, Seul Contre Tous (1998) and Irréversible (2002) that highly specific hard-to-look-away from hodgepodge of irresistible scenes and sequences, achieved not only by many visual effects, but also by amazing atmosphere build-up.
Oscar (Nathaniel Brown) is an American drug dealer living with his sister Linda (Paz de la Huerta) in Tokyo. His friends Alex (Cyril Roy) and Victor (Olly Alexander) are some shady characters who seem to think more about drugs than about their friendship. Victor betrays Oscar at one of their drug related meetings which ends up horribly wrong for Oscar. He dies, but his soul is still floating around because a long time ago he promised his sister never ever to leave her. How Oscar ended up being a drug dealer in Tokyo gets revealed in the remainder of the movie, where the narrative goes all over the place, from past to present to future. Themes of resurrection and reincarnation breath through the plot.
The movie is shot from a first-person viewpoint, first from Oscar himself (with blinking and everything), later from his flying soul. This approach involves the use of many long takes and overhead shots, which are really beautifully crafted, but not as soothing as the regular long takes because of the heavy use of special and visual effects. And with heavy I mean real heavy: Tokyo looks like a neon-like glow-in-the-dark heaven: there are mesmerizing and magical colours everywhere, not only in the regular scenes, but even more so in the trippy visual interludes. Enter The Void is a movie in which special effects have more meaning than just to awe its audience like in Transformers part 7. It makes Enter The Void a compelling family tragedy in supercolour.
Sadly, the movie was a financial failure. It only returned 1,25% of its investment. It must be incredibly hard to sell such a weird movie as this, but I am just happy that this movie exists right here right now.
9

04-13-2014
Enter The Void (2009)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1191111/

Enter The Void is Gaspar Noé’s most colourful yet darkest and freakiest movie yet. It shares with his other movies, Seul Contre Tous (1998) and Irréversible (2002) that highly specific hard-to-look-away from hodgepodge of irresistible scenes and sequences, achieved not only by many visual effects, but also by amazing atmosphere build-up.

Oscar (Nathaniel Brown) is an American drug dealer living with his sister Linda (Paz de la Huerta) in Tokyo. His friends Alex (Cyril Roy) and Victor (Olly Alexander) are some shady characters who seem to think more about drugs than about their friendship. Victor betrays Oscar at one of their drug related meetings which ends up horribly wrong for Oscar. He dies, but his soul is still floating around because a long time ago he promised his sister never ever to leave her. How Oscar ended up being a drug dealer in Tokyo gets revealed in the remainder of the movie, where the narrative goes all over the place, from past to present to future. Themes of resurrection and reincarnation breath through the plot.

The movie is shot from a first-person viewpoint, first from Oscar himself (with blinking and everything), later from his flying soul. This approach involves the use of many long takes and overhead shots, which are really beautifully crafted, but not as soothing as the regular long takes because of the heavy use of special and visual effects. And with heavy I mean real heavy: Tokyo looks like a neon-like glow-in-the-dark heaven: there are mesmerizing and magical colours everywhere, not only in the regular scenes, but even more so in the trippy visual interludes. Enter The Void is a movie in which special effects have more meaning than just to awe its audience like in Transformers part 7. It makes Enter The Void a compelling family tragedy in supercolour.

Sadly, the movie was a financial failure. It only returned 1,25% of its investment. It must be incredibly hard to sell such a weird movie as this, but I am just happy that this movie exists right here right now.

9

@21 hours ago with 1 note
#enter the void #gaspar noe #gaspar noé #seul contre tous #irréversible #nathaniel brown #paz de la huerta #cyril roy #olly alexander #transformers #masato tanno #ed spear 
04-12-2014Galaxy Quest (1999)www.imdb.com/title/tt0177789/
Galaxy Quest should be celebrated for many different things. It’s Sigourney Weaver’s return to space and sciene-fiction in general, after being the star in the Alien and Ghostbusters franchise (granted, Alien: Resurrection (1997), the last part of the Alien movies, was released only two years earlier) and it’s cool to see her in a less serious space adventure. The latter is also to be celebrated: in a time where there were tons of sci-fi movies released that take themselves way too seriously, Galaxy Quest is a more than welcome alternative. Then there is the rest of the cast: Tim Allen will never be my favorite actor, but his washed-up actor performance is great. The smaller roles by Sam Rockwell and Rainn Wilson, Wilson in his first movie acting gig, are a lot of fun as well.
David Newman’s typical science-fiction family friendly score blasts through the opening credits as being part of the tv-series Galaxy Quest, a show that has aired many years ago but still has a massive Star Trek-like cult following. Jason Nesmith (Allen) was the commander of a spaceship called the NSEA Protector, his crew consisted of the sexy Gwen DeMarco (Weaver), Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman), Fred Kwan (Tony Shalhoub), Tommy Webber (Daryl Mitchell) and sixth guy Guy without-a-last-name (Sam Rockwell). As a Galaxy Quest convention is on its way, some actual aliens tell Nesmith about the faith of their planet, which is about to be destroyed by bad guy Sarris (Robin Sachs). The aliens, or Thermians, based their entire existence on the Galaxy Quest tv-show since they interpreted the broadcasts as actual historical documents. Everything on the tv-show is replicated and Nesmith and the crew have to stop Sarris from destroying the Thermians and the universe.
When one takes all the events and sequences with a grain of salt, Galaxy Quest is a wonderful movie. It definitely has its cheesy and corny moments but at the same time it’s very aware of this fact. There are tons of goofs and errors: why doesn’t the cast have friends outside of their colleagues, why do the aliens speak English with each other etc., but the extra dimension the story within the story brings is wonderful. The result is not only a very funny movie (especially Rockwell is hilarious), but an exciting space adventure as well. It’s one of the most convincing space parodies there is, which doesn’t thrive on just one joke or idea, but that makes the most of its premise.
8

04-12-2014
Galaxy Quest (1999)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0177789/

Galaxy Quest should be celebrated for many different things. It’s Sigourney Weaver’s return to space and sciene-fiction in general, after being the star in the Alien and Ghostbusters franchise (granted, Alien: Resurrection (1997), the last part of the Alien movies, was released only two years earlier) and it’s cool to see her in a less serious space adventure. The latter is also to be celebrated: in a time where there were tons of sci-fi movies released that take themselves way too seriously, Galaxy Quest is a more than welcome alternative. Then there is the rest of the cast: Tim Allen will never be my favorite actor, but his washed-up actor performance is great. The smaller roles by Sam Rockwell and Rainn Wilson, Wilson in his first movie acting gig, are a lot of fun as well.

David Newman’s typical science-fiction family friendly score blasts through the opening credits as being part of the tv-series Galaxy Quest, a show that has aired many years ago but still has a massive Star Trek-like cult following. Jason Nesmith (Allen) was the commander of a spaceship called the NSEA Protector, his crew consisted of the sexy Gwen DeMarco (Weaver), Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman), Fred Kwan (Tony Shalhoub), Tommy Webber (Daryl Mitchell) and sixth guy Guy without-a-last-name (Sam Rockwell). As a Galaxy Quest convention is on its way, some actual aliens tell Nesmith about the faith of their planet, which is about to be destroyed by bad guy Sarris (Robin Sachs). The aliens, or Thermians, based their entire existence on the Galaxy Quest tv-show since they interpreted the broadcasts as actual historical documents. Everything on the tv-show is replicated and Nesmith and the crew have to stop Sarris from destroying the Thermians and the universe.

When one takes all the events and sequences with a grain of salt, Galaxy Quest is a wonderful movie. It definitely has its cheesy and corny moments but at the same time it’s very aware of this fact. There are tons of goofs and errors: why doesn’t the cast have friends outside of their colleagues, why do the aliens speak English with each other etc., but the extra dimension the story within the story brings is wonderful. The result is not only a very funny movie (especially Rockwell is hilarious), but an exciting space adventure as well. It’s one of the most convincing space parodies there is, which doesn’t thrive on just one joke or idea, but that makes the most of its premise.

8

@2 days ago with 2 notes
#galaxy quest #sigourney weaver #alien #ghostbusters #alien: resurrection #tim allen #sam rockwell #rainn wilson #david newman #star trek #alan rickman #tony shalhoub #daryl mitchell #robin sachs #enrico colantoni 
04-11-2014La Haine (1995)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113247/
La Haine is French director Mathieu Kassovitz’ most famous and celebrated movie. It is one of the first movies about the rough life in the banlieues of Paris: the title (which translates to ‘the hate’) refers to the hate that is felt between the police and the immigrant youth of the neighborhood.
The Jew Vinz (a young Vincent Cassel at the start of his career), the Arab Saïd (Saïd Taghmaoui) and the African Hubert (Hubert Koundé) are three youngsters living the hard life in the hoods of Paris. They don’t have much to live for except for each other and the general idea of getting respect from the other youth. Their friend Abdel gets beaten up during a police interrogation and the boys take much issue with this. Vinz finds a gun that was dropped by a cop during riots (during the opening credits actual footage of riots in Paris are shown, strong footage that sets the tone for a rough movie) and swears to take revenge if Abdel dies from his injuries.
And like that we follow a day in the life of the three boys. I haven’t seen many movies where the energy of a generations gets an outlet as in here. The emptiness and hopelessness of their lives is shot in beautiful black-and-white by Kassovitz and his cinematographer Pierre Aïm. The contrast the images show are in harmony with the contrast that breathe throughout the lives of the guys: they have got each other, best friends in bad times, but what is the point of it all really? The gun that Vinz finds (which isn’t shown during the movie) adds a specific kind of tension, one that gets it biggest impact in the last couple of scenes, which are predictable but impressive. But as the saying that the boys mutter goes, it’s not about the landing, it’s about the fall. The landing is good, but the fall is even better.
8

04-11-2014
La Haine (1995)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113247/

La Haine is French director Mathieu Kassovitz’ most famous and celebrated movie. It is one of the first movies about the rough life in the banlieues of Paris: the title (which translates to ‘the hate’) refers to the hate that is felt between the police and the immigrant youth of the neighborhood.

The Jew Vinz (a young Vincent Cassel at the start of his career), the Arab Saïd (Saïd Taghmaoui) and the African Hubert (Hubert Koundé) are three youngsters living the hard life in the hoods of Paris. They don’t have much to live for except for each other and the general idea of getting respect from the other youth. Their friend Abdel gets beaten up during a police interrogation and the boys take much issue with this. Vinz finds a gun that was dropped by a cop during riots (during the opening credits actual footage of riots in Paris are shown, strong footage that sets the tone for a rough movie) and swears to take revenge if Abdel dies from his injuries.

And like that we follow a day in the life of the three boys. I haven’t seen many movies where the energy of a generations gets an outlet as in here. The emptiness and hopelessness of their lives is shot in beautiful black-and-white by Kassovitz and his cinematographer Pierre Aïm. The contrast the images show are in harmony with the contrast that breathe throughout the lives of the guys: they have got each other, best friends in bad times, but what is the point of it all really? The gun that Vinz finds (which isn’t shown during the movie) adds a specific kind of tension, one that gets it biggest impact in the last couple of scenes, which are predictable but impressive. But as the saying that the boys mutter goes, it’s not about the landing, it’s about the fall. The landing is good, but the fall is even better.

8

@4 days ago with 1 note
#la haine #hate #mathieu kassovitz #vincent cassel #saïd taghmaoui #said taghmaoui #hubert kounde #hubert koundé #pierre aim #pierre aïm #cut killer #dj cut killer 
04-09-2014Borgman (2013)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1954315/
Borgman is Dutch writer/director Alex van Warmerdam’s interpretation of Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Teorema (1968), in which a stranger visits a house and messes up the relationship of the family living there. Van Warmerdam is one of Hollands most interesting and original directors. In a country where its movies depend almost solely on predictable and overused narratives and poor acting, he is trying something different. The results are often absurd, but that’s only good.
Camiel Borgman (Jan Bijvoet) is rudely awakened by three people who are demolishing his underground house in the woods. He manages to flee and warn his two friends Pascal (Tom Dewispelaere) and Ludwig (Van Warmerdam himself). Still on the run, Borgman reaches a upper-class neighborhood with lots of villas. He rings the doorbell of the estate of Marina (Hadewych Minis, the weakest link of the movie) and Richard (Jeroen Perceval), where he makes a strange impression on Marina. Borgman stays for a while in the house and turns his stay into a nightmare for the family.
Borgman’s intentions remain a mystery for everybody. Why he does what he does is only known to him and his friends, but this never becomes bothersome thanks to Van Warmerdam’s focus on the regular in the most irregular of situations. The most painful and horrific scenes are shot in that calm tone that makes Michael Haneke’s work so tranquilizing, as if nothing really happens. The life of the family continues like before: Richard struggles at work, Marina is tired from being a housewife and painter and the kids go to school. Very subtle though, things change.
The symbolism appears in an exquisite way. It makes for a satire in a compelling plot to look out for. What is really happening might be left in the dark for too long, but it will haunt you for some time after watching it. Borgman is not your everyday thriller, it gives you the creeps in an awkward way.
8

04-09-2014
Borgman (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1954315/

Borgman is Dutch writer/director Alex van Warmerdam’s interpretation of Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Teorema (1968), in which a stranger visits a house and messes up the relationship of the family living there. Van Warmerdam is one of Hollands most interesting and original directors. In a country where its movies depend almost solely on predictable and overused narratives and poor acting, he is trying something different. The results are often absurd, but that’s only good.

Camiel Borgman (Jan Bijvoet) is rudely awakened by three people who are demolishing his underground house in the woods. He manages to flee and warn his two friends Pascal (Tom Dewispelaere) and Ludwig (Van Warmerdam himself). Still on the run, Borgman reaches a upper-class neighborhood with lots of villas. He rings the doorbell of the estate of Marina (Hadewych Minis, the weakest link of the movie) and Richard (Jeroen Perceval), where he makes a strange impression on Marina. Borgman stays for a while in the house and turns his stay into a nightmare for the family.

Borgman’s intentions remain a mystery for everybody. Why he does what he does is only known to him and his friends, but this never becomes bothersome thanks to Van Warmerdam’s focus on the regular in the most irregular of situations. The most painful and horrific scenes are shot in that calm tone that makes Michael Haneke’s work so tranquilizing, as if nothing really happens. The life of the family continues like before: Richard struggles at work, Marina is tired from being a housewife and painter and the kids go to school. Very subtle though, things change.

The symbolism appears in an exquisite way. It makes for a satire in a compelling plot to look out for. What is really happening might be left in the dark for too long, but it will haunt you for some time after watching it. Borgman is not your everyday thriller, it gives you the creeps in an awkward way.

8

@6 days ago
#alex van warmerdam #pier paolo pasolini #teorema #jan bijvoet #tom dewispelaere #hadewych minis #jeroen perceval #michael haneke #sara hjort ditlevsen #annet malherbe #mike weerts #pierre bokma 
04-13-2014Barry Lyndon (1975)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072684/
Of all Stanley Kubrick movies, or at least all of them except for his debut Fear And Desire (1953), Barry Lyndon is the most dependent and reliant on taste. Its 18th century setting makes for a historical costume drama. A beautiful one that is, since cinematography, set decoration, costume design and production design are of exceptional quality. The typical costume drama-like slow-moving plot and a running time of over three hours however could make the audience apprehensive of watching it anyway. Barry Lyndon however turns out to be a gem, a character study of the highest order of a young slightly insecure man who falls in love with his cousin to a tiran-like man. The movie is based on the novel ‘The Luck Of Barry Lyndon’ written by William Makepeace Thackeray in 1844.
Barry Lyndon is a carefully constructed movie with a carefully constructed story. It consists of two parts: the first where young man Redmond Barry (Ryan O’Neal) becomes Barry Lyndon, the second where Barry Lyndon has to deal with being Barry Lyndon. He has many struggles to overcome, from the aforementioned falling in love with his cousin Nora Brady (Gay Hamilton) to a hateful relationship with his son-in-law Lord Bullingdon (Leon Vitali, who brings a Klaus Kinski-like intensity to his role), but the hardest one is that of his own life.
Certain scenes are some of the most compelling Kubrick has ever directed. His subtle directing and use of a wonderful cinematography by John Alcott (who won an Oscar for his work) make for an at times soothing movie to watch, alternated with some incredibly tension-packed scenes. Its running time does cause some scenes to be drifting along without real ends, but everything is accounted for eventually, although at the moment itself it might not really appear all that indispensable.
8

04-13-2014
Barry Lyndon (1975)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072684/

Of all Stanley Kubrick movies, or at least all of them except for his debut Fear And Desire (1953), Barry Lyndon is the most dependent and reliant on taste. Its 18th century setting makes for a historical costume drama. A beautiful one that is, since cinematography, set decoration, costume design and production design are of exceptional quality. The typical costume drama-like slow-moving plot and a running time of over three hours however could make the audience apprehensive of watching it anyway. Barry Lyndon however turns out to be a gem, a character study of the highest order of a young slightly insecure man who falls in love with his cousin to a tiran-like man. The movie is based on the novel ‘The Luck Of Barry Lyndon’ written by William Makepeace Thackeray in 1844.

Barry Lyndon is a carefully constructed movie with a carefully constructed story. It consists of two parts: the first where young man Redmond Barry (Ryan O’Neal) becomes Barry Lyndon, the second where Barry Lyndon has to deal with being Barry Lyndon. He has many struggles to overcome, from the aforementioned falling in love with his cousin Nora Brady (Gay Hamilton) to a hateful relationship with his son-in-law Lord Bullingdon (Leon Vitali, who brings a Klaus Kinski-like intensity to his role), but the hardest one is that of his own life.

Certain scenes are some of the most compelling Kubrick has ever directed. His subtle directing and use of a wonderful cinematography by John Alcott (who won an Oscar for his work) make for an at times soothing movie to watch, alternated with some incredibly tension-packed scenes. Its running time does cause some scenes to be drifting along without real ends, but everything is accounted for eventually, although at the moment itself it might not really appear all that indispensable.

8

@1 day ago with 2 notes
#stanley kubrick #fear and desire #the luck of barry lyndon #william makepeace thackeray #ryan o'neal #gay hamilton #leon vitali #klaus kinski #john alcott #marisa berenson #patrick magee #steven berkoff #murray melvin 
04-11-2014Ober (2006)www.imdb.com/title/tt0476681/
Not often have absurd situations been brought so subtly in a movie as in Dutchman Alex van Warmerdam’s Ober. His trademark combination of deadpan and dark humor with a surrealistic twist work out wonderful. The way in which Van Warmerdam brings his story is unique: even the most random seeming events are brought with such a specific touch that it’s hard not to at least intrigued by it, whether you like the end result or not. I tend to be skeptical of Dutch movies, but the movies of Van Warmerdam are much better than the average Dutch movie.
Edgar (Van Warmerdam) is a waiter in a restaurant in the Netherlands and has been for almost 25 years. He doesn’t show any ambition, his wife is dying, he doesn’t like his mistress anymore and his semi-gangster neighbours are constantly bugging him. Being tired of it all he decides to visit Herman (Mark Rietman), the screenwriter of his life, and demands change. The story within the story (or rather the story next to the story) has its questionable aspects and doesn’t really develop all that smoothly, but because of that extra dimension it has the tendency to get away with it, especially since it shines through that Herman is not the best of writers.
Van Warmerdam delivers his jokes with a timing that is reminiscent of that of Woody Allen in his early days, while the meta-elements and the emphasis on a strange-like ambiance are reminiscent of some of the best work of Charlie Kaufman and Jim Jarmusch. An impressive list of filmmakers, but Van Warmerdam deserves to be in it. Almost every scene is a hit and his directing and acting are almost of an extraordinary level.
8

04-11-2014
Ober (2006)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0476681/

Not often have absurd situations been brought so subtly in a movie as in Dutchman Alex van Warmerdam’s Ober. His trademark combination of deadpan and dark humor with a surrealistic twist work out wonderful. The way in which Van Warmerdam brings his story is unique: even the most random seeming events are brought with such a specific touch that it’s hard not to at least intrigued by it, whether you like the end result or not. I tend to be skeptical of Dutch movies, but the movies of Van Warmerdam are much better than the average Dutch movie.

Edgar (Van Warmerdam) is a waiter in a restaurant in the Netherlands and has been for almost 25 years. He doesn’t show any ambition, his wife is dying, he doesn’t like his mistress anymore and his semi-gangster neighbours are constantly bugging him. Being tired of it all he decides to visit Herman (Mark Rietman), the screenwriter of his life, and demands change. The story within the story (or rather the story next to the story) has its questionable aspects and doesn’t really develop all that smoothly, but because of that extra dimension it has the tendency to get away with it, especially since it shines through that Herman is not the best of writers.

Van Warmerdam delivers his jokes with a timing that is reminiscent of that of Woody Allen in his early days, while the meta-elements and the emphasis on a strange-like ambiance are reminiscent of some of the best work of Charlie Kaufman and Jim Jarmusch. An impressive list of filmmakers, but Van Warmerdam deserves to be in it. Almost every scene is a hit and his directing and acting are almost of an extraordinary level.

8

@3 days ago
#alex van warmerdam #ober #mark rietman #woody allen #charlie kaufman #jim jarmusch #pierre bokma 
04-09-2014Still Smokin (1983)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086366/
It sounds like a great idea: Cheech and Chong in Amsterdam. Two of the funniest stoners in the stoner capital of the world. Could it get any better? Yes it could have, since Still Smokin (their fifth movie as a couple) turns out to be a big disappointment.
Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong (who directed the movie) are in Amsterdam for a film festival devoted to Burt Reynolds and Dolly Parton. Reynolds and Parton never show up though, so the promoter (Hans Man in ‘t Veld in an awful role) depends on Cheech and Chong to perform a show that will make everybody forget about Reynolds and Parton.
The jokes present in Still Smokin are blunt, offensive to minorities and (even worse) not funny most of the time. The guys are preparing for their show in Amsterdam and are thinking about what kind of bits and skits they can perform. They have many of the weirdest ideas (ranging from a talk show with ex-cons to a wrestling match with an invisible man) and they are shown to us, the (presumably) stoned audience. Where Cheech and Chong’s first two movies (Up In Smoke (1978) and Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie (1980)) have the quality to be funny even for non-stoners, Still Smokin isn’t. Behind some of the skits and bits are some funny ideas, but you have to be real high or stoned to not become annoyed by these non-connected non-funny sketches. Cheech and Chong are great, but Still Smokin is a miss.
4

04-09-2014
Still Smokin (1983)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086366/

It sounds like a great idea: Cheech and Chong in Amsterdam. Two of the funniest stoners in the stoner capital of the world. Could it get any better? Yes it could have, since Still Smokin (their fifth movie as a couple) turns out to be a big disappointment.

Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong (who directed the movie) are in Amsterdam for a film festival devoted to Burt Reynolds and Dolly Parton. Reynolds and Parton never show up though, so the promoter (Hans Man in ‘t Veld in an awful role) depends on Cheech and Chong to perform a show that will make everybody forget about Reynolds and Parton.

The jokes present in Still Smokin are blunt, offensive to minorities and (even worse) not funny most of the time. The guys are preparing for their show in Amsterdam and are thinking about what kind of bits and skits they can perform. They have many of the weirdest ideas (ranging from a talk show with ex-cons to a wrestling match with an invisible man) and they are shown to us, the (presumably) stoned audience. Where Cheech and Chong’s first two movies (Up In Smoke (1978) and Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie (1980)) have the quality to be funny even for non-stoners, Still Smokin isn’t. Behind some of the skits and bits are some funny ideas, but you have to be real high or stoned to not become annoyed by these non-connected non-funny sketches. Cheech and Chong are great, but Still Smokin is a miss.

4

@5 days ago with 1 note
#cheech #chong #cheech and chong #marin cheech #tommy chong #thomas chong #burt reynolds #dolly parton #hans man in 't veld #up in smoke #next movie #cheech and chong's next movie 
04-08-2013Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie (1980)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080520/
Cheech and Chong’s second movie adventure is directed by Tommy Chong and written by Chong and Cheech Marin. They’re the centre of all of the stoner laughs imaginable, and their Next Movie isn’t even worse than debut film Up In Smoke (1978).
Where in Up In Smoke all the jokes are centered towards a solid and definite plot, in Next Movie the whole appears more as a collection of sketches and funny scenes which are all loosely connected still. Cheech loses his job and since he isn’t about to do anything productive that day, he is going to wait until his girlfriend Donna (Evelyn Guerrero, who plays the same character in follow-ups Nice Dreams (1981) and Things Are Tough All Over (1982)) is able to drop by. Cheech wants to be alone that day, so he sends off Chong to meet up with his cousin Red (also Cheech). Chong and Red have the wildest adventures all over town. It has a very casual quality though, despite the bluntness and sometimes even rude jokes. Cousin Red is a fun addition to the duo. His more overtly and very present kind of humor goes well with Chong’s ultimate stoner behaviour, whereas in Up In Smoke it’s just watching two stoners being funny. Red’s accent takes a while to get used to though, but the same can be said for Cheech’s high pitched Mexican accent.
Basically this is everything a stoner needs to have a fun evening. A very basic plot, hilarious situations and Cheech and Chong on fire (both literally and figuratively). The movie’s tv version is a disgrace though: Chong and Red are carrying a bag of diamonds instead of weed and in the final scenes where there is an alien encounter the boys don’t get high as fuck, they are being taught to ‘fly like Peter Pan’. The stigma it puts on smoking weed is ridiculous.
7

04-08-2013
Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie (1980)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080520/

Cheech and Chong’s second movie adventure is directed by Tommy Chong and written by Chong and Cheech Marin. They’re the centre of all of the stoner laughs imaginable, and their Next Movie isn’t even worse than debut film Up In Smoke (1978).

Where in Up In Smoke all the jokes are centered towards a solid and definite plot, in Next Movie the whole appears more as a collection of sketches and funny scenes which are all loosely connected still. Cheech loses his job and since he isn’t about to do anything productive that day, he is going to wait until his girlfriend Donna (Evelyn Guerrero, who plays the same character in follow-ups Nice Dreams (1981) and Things Are Tough All Over (1982)) is able to drop by. Cheech wants to be alone that day, so he sends off Chong to meet up with his cousin Red (also Cheech). Chong and Red have the wildest adventures all over town. It has a very casual quality though, despite the bluntness and sometimes even rude jokes. Cousin Red is a fun addition to the duo. His more overtly and very present kind of humor goes well with Chong’s ultimate stoner behaviour, whereas in Up In Smoke it’s just watching two stoners being funny. Red’s accent takes a while to get used to though, but the same can be said for Cheech’s high pitched Mexican accent.

Basically this is everything a stoner needs to have a fun evening. A very basic plot, hilarious situations and Cheech and Chong on fire (both literally and figuratively). The movie’s tv version is a disgrace though: Chong and Red are carrying a bag of diamonds instead of weed and in the final scenes where there is an alien encounter the boys don’t get high as fuck, they are being taught to ‘fly like Peter Pan’. The stigma it puts on smoking weed is ridiculous.

7

@1 week ago with 2 notes
#cheech #chong #cheech marin #tommy chong #cheech and chong #next movie #cheech and chong's next movie #up in smoke #evelyn guerrero #nice dreams #things are tough all over