07-21-2014Noah (2014)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1959490/
It is easy to hate on this movie. Both atheists and believers can easily dismiss the whole idea as a made up story, since the biblical epic Noah is only loosely based on the story of Noah’s Ark. As a result, reviews have been generally alright still, but not as positive as director Darren Aronofsky’s other films. The story has many gaps and the filmmakers used much creative freedom to fill these gaps as they wished, and not everybody is content with that. In a number of Islamic countries Noah has been banned prior to its release. I watched this movie without any prejudice whatsoever and tried to appreciate its story as it is presented by the filmmakers. When one is able to look past the story’s inconsistencies, it is not a true adaptation at all, it features a great story still.
When he was just a little boy, Noah (played in this scene of the movie by Dakota Goyo, for the rest of the film by Russell Crowe) witnesses his father Lamech (Marton Csokas) getting killed by Tubal-cain (Ray Winstone). Years later, Noah is living a sober life with his wife Naameh (Jennifer Connelly) and three sons. After Noah dreams about a flood that will destroy all life, he visits his wise grandfather Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins). Methuselah tells that Noah was chosen to do something important, to build an ark and to help the animals survive the big flood.
Noah is Aronofsky’s most aesthetically ambitious project yet. Production design is of a grand level, as are the graphics and visual effects (post-production lasted over 14 months, results are often stunning). Aronofsky tells his story with a lot of visual bravoure and a bunch of brutal scenes, but he manages to bring more depth than the average summer blockbuster. The final part of the movie features some interesting character development, leading up to an all-out biblical family tragedy.
At no point does this movie fail to dazzle its audience. As a whole it might come across as anything but subtle at certain moments, but that’s only because Aronofsky intended it to be this way. He is on point as a director, delivering one of his most ambitious and satisfying movies yet.
8

07-21-2014
Noah (2014)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1959490/

It is easy to hate on this movie. Both atheists and believers can easily dismiss the whole idea as a made up story, since the biblical epic Noah is only loosely based on the story of Noah’s Ark. As a result, reviews have been generally alright still, but not as positive as director Darren Aronofsky’s other films. The story has many gaps and the filmmakers used much creative freedom to fill these gaps as they wished, and not everybody is content with that. In a number of Islamic countries Noah has been banned prior to its release. I watched this movie without any prejudice whatsoever and tried to appreciate its story as it is presented by the filmmakers. When one is able to look past the story’s inconsistencies, it is not a true adaptation at all, it features a great story still.

When he was just a little boy, Noah (played in this scene of the movie by Dakota Goyo, for the rest of the film by Russell Crowe) witnesses his father Lamech (Marton Csokas) getting killed by Tubal-cain (Ray Winstone). Years later, Noah is living a sober life with his wife Naameh (Jennifer Connelly) and three sons. After Noah dreams about a flood that will destroy all life, he visits his wise grandfather Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins). Methuselah tells that Noah was chosen to do something important, to build an ark and to help the animals survive the big flood.

Noah is Aronofsky’s most aesthetically ambitious project yet. Production design is of a grand level, as are the graphics and visual effects (post-production lasted over 14 months, results are often stunning). Aronofsky tells his story with a lot of visual bravoure and a bunch of brutal scenes, but he manages to bring more depth than the average summer blockbuster. The final part of the movie features some interesting character development, leading up to an all-out biblical family tragedy.

At no point does this movie fail to dazzle its audience. As a whole it might come across as anything but subtle at certain moments, but that’s only because Aronofsky intended it to be this way. He is on point as a director, delivering one of his most ambitious and satisfying movies yet.

8

@1 day ago with 1 note
#noah #darren aronofsky #anthony hopkins #russell crowe #marton csokas #ray winstone #tubal-cain #methuselah #jennifer connelly #emma watson #logan lerman #douglas booth #nick nolte #mark margolis #kevin durand #leo mchugh carroll #madison davenport #finn wittrock #gavin casalegno 
07-19-2014Targets (1968)www.imdb.com/title/tt0063671/
When in the late 60s Peter Bogdanovich was a film programmer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City he met legendary b-movie director Roger Corman. Meeting Corman changed Bogdanovich’s life: Corman invited Bogdanovich to direct two movies, this here Targets and the poorly received Voyage To The Planet of Prehistoric Women (1968). Both are considerably different movies, but share this specific Corman-feeling.
Byron Orlok (Boris Karloff, a character based on Karloff himself) is an aging horror film star who is fed up with the entire movie-making industry. Before he definitely retires he makes a personal appearance at a showing of a movie called The Terror (an actual Roger Corman movie from 1963, many scenes involving Karloff in that movie are featured in Targets). Present at this showing is going to be Bobby (Tim O’Kelly), a happy seeming Vietnam veteran with a lust for guns.
Targets is a stylish movie. It has a slow pace and the plot isn’t all that spectacular, but Bogdanovich’s directing is extremely effective. He directs in a soothing manner and brings out the best of Karloff, who shines in a role that he himself considered one of his favorites. The long takes, as trivial as the may seem, are great to see and it all makes for a cold and bitter movie, which is at the same time charming and terrifying. The scenes in which a cool Bobby shoots at random people is tension-packed and has the same feeling of guilty pleasure as when you’re doing the same thing playing Grand Theft Auto.
7

07-19-2014
Targets (1968)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0063671/

When in the late 60s Peter Bogdanovich was a film programmer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City he met legendary b-movie director Roger Corman. Meeting Corman changed Bogdanovich’s life: Corman invited Bogdanovich to direct two movies, this here Targets and the poorly received Voyage To The Planet of Prehistoric Women (1968). Both are considerably different movies, but share this specific Corman-feeling.

Byron Orlok (Boris Karloff, a character based on Karloff himself) is an aging horror film star who is fed up with the entire movie-making industry. Before he definitely retires he makes a personal appearance at a showing of a movie called The Terror (an actual Roger Corman movie from 1963, many scenes involving Karloff in that movie are featured in Targets). Present at this showing is going to be Bobby (Tim O’Kelly), a happy seeming Vietnam veteran with a lust for guns.

Targets is a stylish movie. It has a slow pace and the plot isn’t all that spectacular, but Bogdanovich’s directing is extremely effective. He directs in a soothing manner and brings out the best of Karloff, who shines in a role that he himself considered one of his favorites. The long takes, as trivial as the may seem, are great to see and it all makes for a cold and bitter movie, which is at the same time charming and terrifying. The scenes in which a cool Bobby shoots at random people is tension-packed and has the same feeling of guilty pleasure as when you’re doing the same thing playing Grand Theft Auto.

7

@4 days ago
#peter bogdanovich #roger corman #targets #voyage to the planet of prehistoric women #boris karloff #the terror #tim o'kelly #grand theft auto #gta #arthur peterson #james brown 
07-18-2014Harvey (1950)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042546/
Harvey is a feel-good movie based on Mary Chase’s Pulitzer Prize play of the same name. It is directed by German born Henry Koster and it turned out to be one of his greatest successes. He directed two of his stars, James Stewart and Josephine Hull, to an Academy Award nomination: Hull even ended up winning.
Elwood P. Dowd (Stewart) is a good-natured, amiable and slightly eccentric man. He likes the more-than-occasional drink and his best friend is a pooka named Harvey, in the form of a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall (let’s stick to the facts, as Dowd would say) invisible rabbit. This friendship is sweet and harmless, but his sister Veta Louise Simmons (Hull) and niece Myrtle Mae Simmons (Victoria Horne) don’t like it a single bit and want Elwood to be institutionalized.
Sadly, Harvey can’t shake the play-feeling it has from the start: the acting is overly theatrical and the long takes at familiar sets and absurd comedy caper situations don’t make this feeling a positive one. However, the ever charming Stewart and some of his fantastic quotes (from a screenplay written by Chase and Oscar Brodney) make Harvey a better than average 50s comedy anyway.  Whether Harvey is the result of Elwood’s drinking, imagination or playfullness nobody knows, but none of these options alter the fact that Elwood is the nicest of men, caring about everybody and wanting everybody to get along, be they real or imaginary. His wonderful behaviour brings out the best of people, just like this movie brings out the best feel-good feelings out of its audience.
7

07-18-2014
Harvey (1950)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042546/

Harvey is a feel-good movie based on Mary Chase’s Pulitzer Prize play of the same name. It is directed by German born Henry Koster and it turned out to be one of his greatest successes. He directed two of his stars, James Stewart and Josephine Hull, to an Academy Award nomination: Hull even ended up winning.

Elwood P. Dowd (Stewart) is a good-natured, amiable and slightly eccentric man. He likes the more-than-occasional drink and his best friend is a pooka named Harvey, in the form of a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall (let’s stick to the facts, as Dowd would say) invisible rabbit. This friendship is sweet and harmless, but his sister Veta Louise Simmons (Hull) and niece Myrtle Mae Simmons (Victoria Horne) don’t like it a single bit and want Elwood to be institutionalized.

Sadly, Harvey can’t shake the play-feeling it has from the start: the acting is overly theatrical and the long takes at familiar sets and absurd comedy caper situations don’t make this feeling a positive one. However, the ever charming Stewart and some of his fantastic quotes (from a screenplay written by Chase and Oscar Brodney) make Harvey a better than average 50s comedy anyway.  Whether Harvey is the result of Elwood’s drinking, imagination or playfullness nobody knows, but none of these options alter the fact that Elwood is the nicest of men, caring about everybody and wanting everybody to get along, be they real or imaginary. His wonderful behaviour brings out the best of people, just like this movie brings out the best feel-good feelings out of its audience.

7

@6 days ago with 1 note
#harvey #mary chase #henry koster #james stewert #josephine hull #victoria horne #cecil kellaway #gino corrado 
07-16-2014Pickpocket (1959)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053168/
Pickpocket is one of Robert Bresson’s mostly watched movies. With a running time of only 75 minutes and a Nouvelle Vague-approved style over substance approach it is also one of the easiest to watch. It’s the first movie Bresson wrote the screenplay for himself.
Michel (Martin LaSalle, a non-professional at the time) resorts to pickpocketing. After he is arrested after doing so at the horse races, he spends a short time in jail. He meets some people who are professional pickpockets after his short jail time, who teach him their trade and who go on some pickpocket adventures with him. Even though Michel wants to quit, he realises it is his only way of surviving in Paris.
Could one turn a blind eye towards certain kinds of thefts? Bresson explores this theme, but never gives an answer. His directing is typically sober, just like the acting, cinematography and music. It makes for a movie that is calculated and meditative, and for those who are willing to fall into its grasp, it’s beautiful. Not only the pickpocketing scenes are beautiful, but so are the scenes in which a reserved Michel (who acts in strangely bad yet mesmerizing way) falls in love with the neighbor of his ill mother.
To many people, Pickpocket might seem to be a slow-moving movie about a thief trying to get what he wants, but Bresson made it into a beautiful one. Even if the style of the movie is not a thriller (as Bresson makes clear in the opening title screen), it has the emotional intensity of one.
7

07-16-2014
Pickpocket (1959)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053168/

Pickpocket is one of Robert Bresson’s mostly watched movies. With a running time of only 75 minutes and a Nouvelle Vague-approved style over substance approach it is also one of the easiest to watch. It’s the first movie Bresson wrote the screenplay for himself.

Michel (Martin LaSalle, a non-professional at the time) resorts to pickpocketing. After he is arrested after doing so at the horse races, he spends a short time in jail. He meets some people who are professional pickpockets after his short jail time, who teach him their trade and who go on some pickpocket adventures with him. Even though Michel wants to quit, he realises it is his only way of surviving in Paris.

Could one turn a blind eye towards certain kinds of thefts? Bresson explores this theme, but never gives an answer. His directing is typically sober, just like the acting, cinematography and music. It makes for a movie that is calculated and meditative, and for those who are willing to fall into its grasp, it’s beautiful. Not only the pickpocketing scenes are beautiful, but so are the scenes in which a reserved Michel (who acts in strangely bad yet mesmerizing way) falls in love with the neighbor of his ill mother.

To many people, Pickpocket might seem to be a slow-moving movie about a thief trying to get what he wants, but Bresson made it into a beautiful one. Even if the style of the movie is not a thriller (as Bresson makes clear in the opening title screen), it has the emotional intensity of one.

7

@1 week ago
#pickpocket #robert bresson #martin lasalle #marika green #kassagi #pierre étaix 
07-20-2014But I’m A Cheerleader (1999)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0179116/
But I’m A Cheerleader is Jamie Babbit’s debut feature film. She worked with the likes of Martin Scorsese, John Sayles and David Fincher before she directed this bubblegum picture. It is a movie about two lesbian girls falling in love, unique in a way that it is told from the women’s perspective.
Megan (Natasha Lyonne) is a popular cheerleader at a suburban high school. When her friends and family get the idea that she might be a lesbian (she doesn’t like kissing her All-American boyfriend, is a vegetarian and has pictures of female models in bathing suits in her locker), they send her to True Directions, a reparative therapy camp where being straight is great. Babbit based her story on a true story about a man who had been sent to a similar camp.
This is sharp satire with a needfully thin plot, but often heartfelt still. The romance that ensues between Megan and her friend Graham (Clea DuVall) is as sweet as can get, with some corny background music to make sure everybody is allowed to shed a tear at the end. But because of some fantastic set design and production design (highly reminiscent of the newer John Waters movies), it all comes across as a bright bubblegum movie, with intense bright pink, blue and green palettes all around.
Just like the John Waters movies, But I’m A Cheerleader is a movie that has more to offer, and needs to have more to offer, than is apparent at first and for most of its viewers. Not only is this a love-story, it also sheds light on gender roles and teenage sexuality in a way that is bold and interesting. Babbit’s use of a thin plot and all kinds of stereotypes makes it all the more bold, but it works out wonderfully well. It is not a great and hilarious comedy, but it is an important one.
7

07-20-2014
But I’m A Cheerleader (1999)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0179116/

But I’m A Cheerleader is Jamie Babbit’s debut feature film. She worked with the likes of Martin Scorsese, John Sayles and David Fincher before she directed this bubblegum picture. It is a movie about two lesbian girls falling in love, unique in a way that it is told from the women’s perspective.

Megan (Natasha Lyonne) is a popular cheerleader at a suburban high school. When her friends and family get the idea that she might be a lesbian (she doesn’t like kissing her All-American boyfriend, is a vegetarian and has pictures of female models in bathing suits in her locker), they send her to True Directions, a reparative therapy camp where being straight is great. Babbit based her story on a true story about a man who had been sent to a similar camp.

This is sharp satire with a needfully thin plot, but often heartfelt still. The romance that ensues between Megan and her friend Graham (Clea DuVall) is as sweet as can get, with some corny background music to make sure everybody is allowed to shed a tear at the end. But because of some fantastic set design and production design (highly reminiscent of the newer John Waters movies), it all comes across as a bright bubblegum movie, with intense bright pink, blue and green palettes all around.

Just like the John Waters movies, But I’m A Cheerleader is a movie that has more to offer, and needs to have more to offer, than is apparent at first and for most of its viewers. Not only is this a love-story, it also sheds light on gender roles and teenage sexuality in a way that is bold and interesting. Babbit’s use of a thin plot and all kinds of stereotypes makes it all the more bold, but it works out wonderfully well. It is not a great and hilarious comedy, but it is an important one.

7

@2 days ago with 9 notes
#but i'm a cheerleader #jamie babbit #martin scorsese #john sayles #david fincher #natasha lyonne #true directions #clea duvall #john waters #michelle williams #bud cort #mink stole #rupaul #rupaul charles #cathy moriarty #eddie cibrian #melanie lynskey #katrina phillips #katharine towne #joel michaely #julie delpy 
07-19-2014Summer Of Sam (1999)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0162677/
I am currently right in the middle of a heat wave, it’s 97 degrees outside and no fan can cool me off enough to become comfortable with it. To make the most out of this situation, I decided to watch Summer Of Sam, Spike Lee’s typical New York City-movie about a serial killer on the loose in the five boroughs during on of the hottest summers in recorded history: in 1977.
New York City lives in fear of the Son of Sam, a serial killer that has shot and killed several brown haired women in their cars. The police can’t get a hold of him, so a group of Italian-American guys from The Bronx go out to find him as well, including Vinny (John Leguizamo) and his friend Richie (Adrien Brody). It’s hard for everybody to keep their cool in the immense heat and everybody starts to distrust each other. What if the killer is one of them? Lee raises his usual racial questions, but only treats them subtlely, not as in-your-face as in, say, Do The Right Thing (1989) or Clockers (1995). Instead of black vs. white (which still is an issue in this movie), the focus is more on disco vs. punk. It’s 1977, the year punk broke.
It’s hot, hazy and humid. Lee successfully transforms the heat of the summer to the screen and with a muggy and sultry coolness Lee directs some fascinating scenes: more than just a few of those are some fine long takes. This sultry feeling that is hanging around sadly messes with the flow of the film halfway through, when a point is reached that Lee, instead of focusing on who the killer is, is more interested in portraying the hard lives of particularly these men in Yankees-loving The Bronx.
7

07-19-2014
Summer Of Sam (1999)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0162677/

I am currently right in the middle of a heat wave, it’s 97 degrees outside and no fan can cool me off enough to become comfortable with it. To make the most out of this situation, I decided to watch Summer Of Sam, Spike Lee’s typical New York City-movie about a serial killer on the loose in the five boroughs during on of the hottest summers in recorded history: in 1977.

New York City lives in fear of the Son of Sam, a serial killer that has shot and killed several brown haired women in their cars. The police can’t get a hold of him, so a group of Italian-American guys from The Bronx go out to find him as well, including Vinny (John Leguizamo) and his friend Richie (Adrien Brody). It’s hard for everybody to keep their cool in the immense heat and everybody starts to distrust each other. What if the killer is one of them? Lee raises his usual racial questions, but only treats them subtlely, not as in-your-face as in, say, Do The Right Thing (1989) or Clockers (1995). Instead of black vs. white (which still is an issue in this movie), the focus is more on disco vs. punk. It’s 1977, the year punk broke.

It’s hot, hazy and humid. Lee successfully transforms the heat of the summer to the screen and with a muggy and sultry coolness Lee directs some fascinating scenes: more than just a few of those are some fine long takes. This sultry feeling that is hanging around sadly messes with the flow of the film halfway through, when a point is reached that Lee, instead of focusing on who the killer is, is more interested in portraying the hard lives of particularly these men in Yankees-loving The Bronx.

7

@5 days ago
#summer of sam #son of sam #spike lee #john leguizamo #do the right thing #clockers #mira sorvino #jennifer esposito #michael rispoli #saverio guerra #brian tarantina #ken garito #bebe neuwirth #mike starr #ben gazzara #michael imperioli #evander holyfield #adrien brody 
07-17-2014The Trip (1967)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0062395/
Written by Jack Nicholson and starring Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, The Trip is kind of like the hallucinatory predecessor of Easy Rider (1969), which stars the three while Hopper directs Fonda’s and Hopper’s story. The Trip is directed by low-budget B movie hero Roger Corman (who directed Nicholson and Fonda on previous occasions, to make the circle complete).
While coping with the stress of being a tv-commercial director and of being in the middle of a divorce from his wife Sally (Susan Strasberg), Paul (Fonda) is about to embark on his first ever acid adventure. He is guided by John (Bruce Stern), the friendly seeming bearded supplier. Paul has a crazy trip, with its good moments and bad moments, featuring dwarfs, hooded horsemen riders and whatnot.
Be it a warning against using it (as is mentioned in the foreword) or not, The Trip is trippy as fuck and has many fun and hallucinatory visual results in a psychedelic temple. However, I enjoyed the non-image trippy sequences better than I did the image trippy sequences, which have succumbed to the rigors of time. The more inwardly trippy sequences, in which Paul has fascinating conversations with John and other random people as he is wandering through the city are more interesting and, as far as I know, a more realistic depiction of the effects of the drug. The Trip depicts a trip on acid like no other movie before, brightly coloured and bizarre.
7

07-17-2014
The Trip (1967)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0062395/

Written by Jack Nicholson and starring Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, The Trip is kind of like the hallucinatory predecessor of Easy Rider (1969), which stars the three while Hopper directs Fonda’s and Hopper’s story. The Trip is directed by low-budget B movie hero Roger Corman (who directed Nicholson and Fonda on previous occasions, to make the circle complete).

While coping with the stress of being a tv-commercial director and of being in the middle of a divorce from his wife Sally (Susan Strasberg), Paul (Fonda) is about to embark on his first ever acid adventure. He is guided by John (Bruce Stern), the friendly seeming bearded supplier. Paul has a crazy trip, with its good moments and bad moments, featuring dwarfs, hooded horsemen riders and whatnot.

Be it a warning against using it (as is mentioned in the foreword) or not, The Trip is trippy as fuck and has many fun and hallucinatory visual results in a psychedelic temple. However, I enjoyed the non-image trippy sequences better than I did the image trippy sequences, which have succumbed to the rigors of time. The more inwardly trippy sequences, in which Paul has fascinating conversations with John and other random people as he is wandering through the city are more interesting and, as far as I know, a more realistic depiction of the effects of the drug. The Trip depicts a trip on acid like no other movie before, brightly coloured and bizarre.

7

@1 week ago with 1 note
#jack nicholson #peter fonda #dennis hopper #the trip #easy rider #roger corman #susan strasberg #bruce stern #luana anders 
07-13-2014Mean Machine (2001)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0291341/
Football player turned actor Vinnie Jones is the lead in Mean Machine, a movie based on Robert Aldrich’s The Longest Yard (1974), starring Burt Reynolds. It is the perfect role for Jones, a former hard-hitting English midfielder who is playing a former captain of the English national team who got accused of fixing matches. Mean Machine is directed by one-time director Barry Skolnick.
Danny Meehan (Jones) is arrested for drunken assault after a high speed chase through the city. The former star player gets thrown in jail for his violent behaviour, a place filled with dubious characters who all seem to dislike Meehan for his history of fixing matches. To win over the respect of the other inmates, Meehan decides to be the coach of the jail’s football team, a team that is about to play a team of the wardens. It is not the most innovative plot ever, which is what anybody could have expected for a movie like this. What is disturbing though, is that it is poorly and seemingly hastily written, without much care for character development, a logical flow or tidiness.
What is also problematic is that for a comedy, Mean Machine very rarely gets funny. Jones is more passive than he is in his defining roles in Lock, Stock And Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Snatch. (2000), roles that are perfectly suited for him. Surely a role as former football player would be more than suitable too, but it’s not as memorable.
Then there is the series of scenes the movie is building up to the entire time: the match. It has been proven pretty much impossible to bring the intensity and emotions of a sports match to the big screen, something that Mean Machine can’t seem to do as well. Because of some random fast cuts, messy directing and a annoying soundtrack, it is rather anti-climatic.
4

07-13-2014
Mean Machine (2001)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0291341/

Football player turned actor Vinnie Jones is the lead in Mean Machine, a movie based on Robert Aldrich’s The Longest Yard (1974), starring Burt Reynolds. It is the perfect role for Jones, a former hard-hitting English midfielder who is playing a former captain of the English national team who got accused of fixing matches. Mean Machine is directed by one-time director Barry Skolnick.

Danny Meehan (Jones) is arrested for drunken assault after a high speed chase through the city. The former star player gets thrown in jail for his violent behaviour, a place filled with dubious characters who all seem to dislike Meehan for his history of fixing matches. To win over the respect of the other inmates, Meehan decides to be the coach of the jail’s football team, a team that is about to play a team of the wardens. It is not the most innovative plot ever, which is what anybody could have expected for a movie like this. What is disturbing though, is that it is poorly and seemingly hastily written, without much care for character development, a logical flow or tidiness.

What is also problematic is that for a comedy, Mean Machine very rarely gets funny. Jones is more passive than he is in his defining roles in Lock, Stock And Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Snatch. (2000), roles that are perfectly suited for him. Surely a role as former football player would be more than suitable too, but it’s not as memorable.

Then there is the series of scenes the movie is building up to the entire time: the match. It has been proven pretty much impossible to bring the intensity and emotions of a sports match to the big screen, something that Mean Machine can’t seem to do as well. Because of some random fast cuts, messy directing and a annoying soundtrack, it is rather anti-climatic.

4

@1 week ago with 2 notes
#vinnie jones #mean machine #robert aldrich #the longest yard #burt reynolds #barry skolnick #lock stock and two smoking barrels #lock stock #lock stock & two smoking barrels #snatch. #snatch #david kelly #david hemmings #ralph brown #vas blackwood #robbie gee #geoff bell #sally phillips #danny dyer #jason flemyng #jason statham