04-15-2014Night At The Museum (2006)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0477347/
There is nothing wrong with mindless fun every once in a while. It’s nice to just sit back and enjoy the nonsense, instead of watching intellectual cinema on the other end of spectrum. I prefer the latter, but even though Night At The Museum is not a ‘good’ movie, it sure is entertaining, at least for a while.
Larry (Ben Stiller) is a divorced father of the ten year-old Nick (Jake Cherry). Larry wants to bond with Nick, but he is only allowed to see him so many days a month, and considering the fact he just lost his job and has to move again, things are starting to look grim. He decides things need to change and takes a job as night guard at the Museum of Natural History in New York City. An easy enough job, so it seems, but at nighttime all animals and exhibits come to life. Larry has to find a way of keeping it all under control while having to deal with old bad guys Cecil (Dick Van Dyke), Gus (Mickey Rooney) and Reginald (Bill Cobbs) and his boss Dr. McPhee (Ricky Gervais).
For me it’s hit or miss with Ben Stiller, although I have to admit it’s more miss than hit. His overtly trying to be funny has the tendency to work on my nerve, but, aside some corny moments, his character is fun in Night At The Museum. It’s hard to become annoyed because of all the mayhem happening on screen: tiny gladiators and cowboys are constantly fighting, a t-rex is constantly running around next to mammoths, zebras, lions and the like, neanderthalers are dangerously playing with fire and much more. As one of the props mentions, the museum is on the edge of total anarchy, but is it really? Almost none of the characters are well developed, Octavius being a kiss ass for instance is mentioned once but just doesn’t work out, while vital character mister pharaoh is a mystery ignored for most of the film. It made me think of the Toy Story movies, where stuff coming to live does work out well.
Despite this though, Night At The Museum definitely has its moments to entertain you. It’s funny and adventurous and even though Shawn Levy (who recently directed The Internship (2013)) isn’t the most innovative director around, he directs with style. Once you let yourself enjoy it, Night At The Museum is a fun movie.
5

04-15-2014
Night At The Museum (2006)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0477347/

There is nothing wrong with mindless fun every once in a while. It’s nice to just sit back and enjoy the nonsense, instead of watching intellectual cinema on the other end of spectrum. I prefer the latter, but even though Night At The Museum is not a ‘good’ movie, it sure is entertaining, at least for a while.

Larry (Ben Stiller) is a divorced father of the ten year-old Nick (Jake Cherry). Larry wants to bond with Nick, but he is only allowed to see him so many days a month, and considering the fact he just lost his job and has to move again, things are starting to look grim. He decides things need to change and takes a job as night guard at the Museum of Natural History in New York City. An easy enough job, so it seems, but at nighttime all animals and exhibits come to life. Larry has to find a way of keeping it all under control while having to deal with old bad guys Cecil (Dick Van Dyke), Gus (Mickey Rooney) and Reginald (Bill Cobbs) and his boss Dr. McPhee (Ricky Gervais).

For me it’s hit or miss with Ben Stiller, although I have to admit it’s more miss than hit. His overtly trying to be funny has the tendency to work on my nerve, but, aside some corny moments, his character is fun in Night At The Museum. It’s hard to become annoyed because of all the mayhem happening on screen: tiny gladiators and cowboys are constantly fighting, a t-rex is constantly running around next to mammoths, zebras, lions and the like, neanderthalers are dangerously playing with fire and much more. As one of the props mentions, the museum is on the edge of total anarchy, but is it really? Almost none of the characters are well developed, Octavius being a kiss ass for instance is mentioned once but just doesn’t work out, while vital character mister pharaoh is a mystery ignored for most of the film. It made me think of the Toy Story movies, where stuff coming to live does work out well.

Despite this though, Night At The Museum definitely has its moments to entertain you. It’s funny and adventurous and even though Shawn Levy (who recently directed The Internship (2013)) isn’t the most innovative director around, he directs with style. Once you let yourself enjoy it, Night At The Museum is a fun movie.

5

@12 hours ago
#night at the museum #ben stiller #jake cherry #museum of natural history #dick van dyke #mickey rooney #bill cobbs #ricky gervais #toy story #shawn levy #the internship #carla gugino #robin williams #steve coogan #owen wilson #pierfrancesco favino 
04-14-2014Le Boucher (1970)www.imdb.com/title/tt0064106/
Made right in the middle of his highly prolific career, Claude Chabrol’s Le Boucher (English title: The Butcher) is typically French and typically Chabrol.
Local butcher Popaul (Chabrol regular Jean Yanne) and teacher Hélène (Stéphane Audran, Chabrol’s wife at the time) meet each other at their friends’ wedding. They begin a close yet platonic relationship, although in an intimate scene it is revealed that Popaul has more feelings for her. Hélène rejects Popaul as a lover, which has its drastic repercussions. When in the idyllic town they live in murders occur, Hélène starts to suspect Popaul, who of course has his profession against him in this regard.
Le Boucher manages to maintain a creepy and introvert ambiance throughout its short running time. The long takes, smoothly directed by Chabrol and shot by Jean Rabier, make for an enchanting watch which never bores despite the fact that nothing much happens. Chabrol explores his characters, who are both very troubled in their own specific ways, in a subtle way, one that can be easily overlooked by an unaware audience. Popaul has been in the army in Algeria and Indochina and has seen many horrible things, Hélène has had her share of love-at-first-sight-gone-wrong. The murders are only talked about and only one dead body is seen, but it adds up to a feeling of mystery and uncertainty. Instead of relying on plot twists and spectacular murder scenes, there is a psychological tension building up ever since Popaul cuts the meat at the wedding.
8

04-14-2014
Le Boucher (1970)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0064106/

Made right in the middle of his highly prolific career, Claude Chabrol’s Le Boucher (English title: The Butcher) is typically French and typically Chabrol.

Local butcher Popaul (Chabrol regular Jean Yanne) and teacher Hélène (Stéphane Audran, Chabrol’s wife at the time) meet each other at their friends’ wedding. They begin a close yet platonic relationship, although in an intimate scene it is revealed that Popaul has more feelings for her. Hélène rejects Popaul as a lover, which has its drastic repercussions. When in the idyllic town they live in murders occur, Hélène starts to suspect Popaul, who of course has his profession against him in this regard.

Le Boucher manages to maintain a creepy and introvert ambiance throughout its short running time. The long takes, smoothly directed by Chabrol and shot by Jean Rabier, make for an enchanting watch which never bores despite the fact that nothing much happens. Chabrol explores his characters, who are both very troubled in their own specific ways, in a subtle way, one that can be easily overlooked by an unaware audience. Popaul has been in the army in Algeria and Indochina and has seen many horrible things, Hélène has had her share of love-at-first-sight-gone-wrong. The murders are only talked about and only one dead body is seen, but it adds up to a feeling of mystery and uncertainty. Instead of relying on plot twists and spectacular murder scenes, there is a psychological tension building up ever since Popaul cuts the meat at the wedding.

8

@2 days ago with 1 note
#claude chabrol #le boucher #the butcher #jean yanne #stephane audran #stéphane audran #jean rabier 
04-13-2014Barry Lyndon (1975)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072684/
Of all Stanley Kubrick movies, or at least all of them except for his debut Fear And Desire (1953), Barry Lyndon is the most dependent and reliant on taste. Its 18th century setting makes for a historical costume drama. A beautiful one that is, since cinematography, set decoration, costume design and production design are of exceptional quality. The typical costume drama-like slow-moving plot and a running time of over three hours however could make the audience apprehensive of watching it anyway. Barry Lyndon however turns out to be a gem, a character study of the highest order of a young slightly insecure man who falls in love with his cousin to a tiran-like man. The movie is based on the novel ‘The Luck Of Barry Lyndon’ written by William Makepeace Thackeray in 1844.
Barry Lyndon is a carefully constructed movie with a carefully constructed story. It consists of two parts: the first where young man Redmond Barry (Ryan O’Neal) becomes Barry Lyndon, the second where Barry Lyndon has to deal with being Barry Lyndon. He has many struggles to overcome, from the aforementioned falling in love with his cousin Nora Brady (Gay Hamilton) to a hateful relationship with his son-in-law Lord Bullingdon (Leon Vitali, who brings a Klaus Kinski-like intensity to his role), but the hardest one is that of his own life.
Certain scenes are some of the most compelling Kubrick has ever directed. His subtle directing and use of a wonderful cinematography by John Alcott (who won an Oscar for his work) make for an at times soothing movie to watch, alternated with some incredibly tension-packed scenes. Its running time does cause some scenes to be drifting along without real ends, but everything is accounted for eventually, although at the moment itself it might not really appear all that indispensable.
8

04-13-2014
Barry Lyndon (1975)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072684/

Of all Stanley Kubrick movies, or at least all of them except for his debut Fear And Desire (1953), Barry Lyndon is the most dependent and reliant on taste. Its 18th century setting makes for a historical costume drama. A beautiful one that is, since cinematography, set decoration, costume design and production design are of exceptional quality. The typical costume drama-like slow-moving plot and a running time of over three hours however could make the audience apprehensive of watching it anyway. Barry Lyndon however turns out to be a gem, a character study of the highest order of a young slightly insecure man who falls in love with his cousin to a tiran-like man. The movie is based on the novel ‘The Luck Of Barry Lyndon’ written by William Makepeace Thackeray in 1844.

Barry Lyndon is a carefully constructed movie with a carefully constructed story. It consists of two parts: the first where young man Redmond Barry (Ryan O’Neal) becomes Barry Lyndon, the second where Barry Lyndon has to deal with being Barry Lyndon. He has many struggles to overcome, from the aforementioned falling in love with his cousin Nora Brady (Gay Hamilton) to a hateful relationship with his son-in-law Lord Bullingdon (Leon Vitali, who brings a Klaus Kinski-like intensity to his role), but the hardest one is that of his own life.

Certain scenes are some of the most compelling Kubrick has ever directed. His subtle directing and use of a wonderful cinematography by John Alcott (who won an Oscar for his work) make for an at times soothing movie to watch, alternated with some incredibly tension-packed scenes. Its running time does cause some scenes to be drifting along without real ends, but everything is accounted for eventually, although at the moment itself it might not really appear all that indispensable.

8

@4 days ago with 2 notes
#stanley kubrick #fear and desire #the luck of barry lyndon #william makepeace thackeray #ryan o'neal #gay hamilton #leon vitali #klaus kinski #john alcott #marisa berenson #patrick magee #steven berkoff #murray melvin 
04-11-2014Ober (2006)www.imdb.com/title/tt0476681/
Not often have absurd situations been brought so subtly in a movie as in Dutchman Alex van Warmerdam’s Ober. His trademark combination of deadpan and dark humor with a surrealistic twist work out wonderful. The way in which Van Warmerdam brings his story is unique: even the most random seeming events are brought with such a specific touch that it’s hard not to at least intrigued by it, whether you like the end result or not. I tend to be skeptical of Dutch movies, but the movies of Van Warmerdam are much better than the average Dutch movie.
Edgar (Van Warmerdam) is a waiter in a restaurant in the Netherlands and has been for almost 25 years. He doesn’t show any ambition, his wife is dying, he doesn’t like his mistress anymore and his semi-gangster neighbours are constantly bugging him. Being tired of it all he decides to visit Herman (Mark Rietman), the screenwriter of his life, and demands change. The story within the story (or rather the story next to the story) has its questionable aspects and doesn’t really develop all that smoothly, but because of that extra dimension it has the tendency to get away with it, especially since it shines through that Herman is not the best of writers.
Van Warmerdam delivers his jokes with a timing that is reminiscent of that of Woody Allen in his early days, while the meta-elements and the emphasis on a strange-like ambiance are reminiscent of some of the best work of Charlie Kaufman and Jim Jarmusch. An impressive list of filmmakers, but Van Warmerdam deserves to be in it. Almost every scene is a hit and his directing and acting are almost of an extraordinary level.
8

04-11-2014
Ober (2006)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0476681/

Not often have absurd situations been brought so subtly in a movie as in Dutchman Alex van Warmerdam’s Ober. His trademark combination of deadpan and dark humor with a surrealistic twist work out wonderful. The way in which Van Warmerdam brings his story is unique: even the most random seeming events are brought with such a specific touch that it’s hard not to at least intrigued by it, whether you like the end result or not. I tend to be skeptical of Dutch movies, but the movies of Van Warmerdam are much better than the average Dutch movie.

Edgar (Van Warmerdam) is a waiter in a restaurant in the Netherlands and has been for almost 25 years. He doesn’t show any ambition, his wife is dying, he doesn’t like his mistress anymore and his semi-gangster neighbours are constantly bugging him. Being tired of it all he decides to visit Herman (Mark Rietman), the screenwriter of his life, and demands change. The story within the story (or rather the story next to the story) has its questionable aspects and doesn’t really develop all that smoothly, but because of that extra dimension it has the tendency to get away with it, especially since it shines through that Herman is not the best of writers.

Van Warmerdam delivers his jokes with a timing that is reminiscent of that of Woody Allen in his early days, while the meta-elements and the emphasis on a strange-like ambiance are reminiscent of some of the best work of Charlie Kaufman and Jim Jarmusch. An impressive list of filmmakers, but Van Warmerdam deserves to be in it. Almost every scene is a hit and his directing and acting are almost of an extraordinary level.

8

@6 days ago with 1 note
#alex van warmerdam #ober #mark rietman #woody allen #charlie kaufman #jim jarmusch #pierre bokma 
04-14-2014Miele (2013)www.imdb.com/title/tt2357461/
Miele (English title: Honey) is actress-turned-director Valeria Golino’s (mostly famous for her roles in Rain Man (1988) and Frida (2002)) first directed feature film. With difficult topics like euthanasia and suicide it’s not the easiest movie to start out with, but Golino made a beautiful film. The film won a commendation from the Ecumenical Jury at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.
Irene (Jasmine Trinca), nicknamed Miele, has an odd job. Every month she flies from Italy to Washington, then rides the tourist bus to Mexico to get a veterinary drug used for euthanizing dogs. This drug she supplies to people who are terminally and want to have a peaceful death, making her a cute female Dr. Kevorkian. After she delivers her drug to Carlo Grimaldi (Carlo Cecchi), she finds out he is not terminally ill at all and just wants to die. Miele, who only wants to help people in dire need, something that becomes apparent in an ambiguous scene where she meets a couple who want to have their picture taken, can’t live with this and is determined not to have Grimaldi kill himself.
Golino focuses on Miele’s life, who feels the need to help people in need, but Miele herself has her share of problems as well. It’s hard not to feel for Miele and Grimaldi, and in that way the movie strikes the right tone. Making a movie with a political theme like this is near impossible without making your opinion clear as a filmmaker, but Golino manages to stay on the sideline. She registers Miele and her moral struggles in a calm way, without distracting plot twists and without discussing general opinions.
There is really only one thing wrong with this movie (besides its sometimes fragmented seeming narrative): the diverse soundtrack ranges from a nice mood-setting score to hipster approved indie music, the latter being problematic since it’s really dependent on taste.
7

04-14-2014
Miele (2013)
www.imdb.com/title/tt2357461/

Miele (English title: Honey) is actress-turned-director Valeria Golino’s (mostly famous for her roles in Rain Man (1988) and Frida (2002)) first directed feature film. With difficult topics like euthanasia and suicide it’s not the easiest movie to start out with, but Golino made a beautiful film. The film won a commendation from the Ecumenical Jury at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

Irene (Jasmine Trinca), nicknamed Miele, has an odd job. Every month she flies from Italy to Washington, then rides the tourist bus to Mexico to get a veterinary drug used for euthanizing dogs. This drug she supplies to people who are terminally and want to have a peaceful death, making her a cute female Dr. Kevorkian. After she delivers her drug to Carlo Grimaldi (Carlo Cecchi), she finds out he is not terminally ill at all and just wants to die. Miele, who only wants to help people in dire need, something that becomes apparent in an ambiguous scene where she meets a couple who want to have their picture taken, can’t live with this and is determined not to have Grimaldi kill himself.

Golino focuses on Miele’s life, who feels the need to help people in need, but Miele herself has her share of problems as well. It’s hard not to feel for Miele and Grimaldi, and in that way the movie strikes the right tone. Making a movie with a political theme like this is near impossible without making your opinion clear as a filmmaker, but Golino manages to stay on the sideline. She registers Miele and her moral struggles in a calm way, without distracting plot twists and without discussing general opinions.

There is really only one thing wrong with this movie (besides its sometimes fragmented seeming narrative): the diverse soundtrack ranges from a nice mood-setting score to hipster approved indie music, the latter being problematic since it’s really dependent on taste.

7

@1 day ago
#miele #valeria golino #rain man #frida #jasmine trinca #carlo cecchi #honey 
04-13-2014Enter The Void (2009)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1191111/
Enter The Void is Gaspar Noé’s most colourful yet darkest and freakiest movie yet. It shares with his other movies, Seul Contre Tous (1998) and Irréversible (2002) that highly specific hard-to-look-away from hodgepodge of irresistible scenes and sequences, achieved not only by many visual effects, but also by amazing atmosphere build-up.
Oscar (Nathaniel Brown) is an American drug dealer living with his sister Linda (Paz de la Huerta) in Tokyo. His friends Alex (Cyril Roy) and Victor (Olly Alexander) are some shady characters who seem to think more about drugs than about their friendship. Victor betrays Oscar at one of their drug related meetings which ends up horribly wrong for Oscar. He dies, but his soul is still floating around because a long time ago he promised his sister never ever to leave her. How Oscar ended up being a drug dealer in Tokyo gets revealed in the remainder of the movie, where the narrative goes all over the place, from past to present to future. Themes of resurrection and reincarnation breath through the plot.
The movie is shot from a first-person viewpoint, first from Oscar himself (with blinking and everything), later from his flying soul. This approach involves the use of many long takes and overhead shots, which are really beautifully crafted, but not as soothing as the regular long takes because of the heavy use of special and visual effects. And with heavy I mean real heavy: Tokyo looks like a neon-like glow-in-the-dark heaven: there are mesmerizing and magical colours everywhere, not only in the regular scenes, but even more so in the trippy visual interludes. Enter The Void is a movie in which special effects have more meaning than just to awe its audience like in Transformers part 7. It makes Enter The Void a compelling family tragedy in supercolour.
Sadly, the movie was a financial failure. It only returned 1,25% of its investment. It must be incredibly hard to sell such a weird movie as this, but I am just happy that this movie exists right here right now.
9

04-13-2014
Enter The Void (2009)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1191111/

Enter The Void is Gaspar Noé’s most colourful yet darkest and freakiest movie yet. It shares with his other movies, Seul Contre Tous (1998) and Irréversible (2002) that highly specific hard-to-look-away from hodgepodge of irresistible scenes and sequences, achieved not only by many visual effects, but also by amazing atmosphere build-up.

Oscar (Nathaniel Brown) is an American drug dealer living with his sister Linda (Paz de la Huerta) in Tokyo. His friends Alex (Cyril Roy) and Victor (Olly Alexander) are some shady characters who seem to think more about drugs than about their friendship. Victor betrays Oscar at one of their drug related meetings which ends up horribly wrong for Oscar. He dies, but his soul is still floating around because a long time ago he promised his sister never ever to leave her. How Oscar ended up being a drug dealer in Tokyo gets revealed in the remainder of the movie, where the narrative goes all over the place, from past to present to future. Themes of resurrection and reincarnation breath through the plot.

The movie is shot from a first-person viewpoint, first from Oscar himself (with blinking and everything), later from his flying soul. This approach involves the use of many long takes and overhead shots, which are really beautifully crafted, but not as soothing as the regular long takes because of the heavy use of special and visual effects. And with heavy I mean real heavy: Tokyo looks like a neon-like glow-in-the-dark heaven: there are mesmerizing and magical colours everywhere, not only in the regular scenes, but even more so in the trippy visual interludes. Enter The Void is a movie in which special effects have more meaning than just to awe its audience like in Transformers part 7. It makes Enter The Void a compelling family tragedy in supercolour.

Sadly, the movie was a financial failure. It only returned 1,25% of its investment. It must be incredibly hard to sell such a weird movie as this, but I am just happy that this movie exists right here right now.

9

@3 days ago with 1 note
#enter the void #gaspar noe #gaspar noé #seul contre tous #irréversible #nathaniel brown #paz de la huerta #cyril roy #olly alexander #transformers #masato tanno #ed spear 
04-12-2014Galaxy Quest (1999)www.imdb.com/title/tt0177789/
Galaxy Quest should be celebrated for many different things. It’s Sigourney Weaver’s return to space and sciene-fiction in general, after being the star in the Alien and Ghostbusters franchise (granted, Alien: Resurrection (1997), the last part of the Alien movies, was released only two years earlier) and it’s cool to see her in a less serious space adventure. The latter is also to be celebrated: in a time where there were tons of sci-fi movies released that take themselves way too seriously, Galaxy Quest is a more than welcome alternative. Then there is the rest of the cast: Tim Allen will never be my favorite actor, but his washed-up actor performance is great. The smaller roles by Sam Rockwell and Rainn Wilson, Wilson in his first movie acting gig, are a lot of fun as well.
David Newman’s typical science-fiction family friendly score blasts through the opening credits as being part of the tv-series Galaxy Quest, a show that has aired many years ago but still has a massive Star Trek-like cult following. Jason Nesmith (Allen) was the commander of a spaceship called the NSEA Protector, his crew consisted of the sexy Gwen DeMarco (Weaver), Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman), Fred Kwan (Tony Shalhoub), Tommy Webber (Daryl Mitchell) and sixth guy Guy without-a-last-name (Sam Rockwell). As a Galaxy Quest convention is on its way, some actual aliens tell Nesmith about the faith of their planet, which is about to be destroyed by bad guy Sarris (Robin Sachs). The aliens, or Thermians, based their entire existence on the Galaxy Quest tv-show since they interpreted the broadcasts as actual historical documents. Everything on the tv-show is replicated and Nesmith and the crew have to stop Sarris from destroying the Thermians and the universe.
When one takes all the events and sequences with a grain of salt, Galaxy Quest is a wonderful movie. It definitely has its cheesy and corny moments but at the same time it’s very aware of this fact. There are tons of goofs and errors: why doesn’t the cast have friends outside of their colleagues, why do the aliens speak English with each other etc., but the extra dimension the story within the story brings is wonderful. The result is not only a very funny movie (especially Rockwell is hilarious), but an exciting space adventure as well. It’s one of the most convincing space parodies there is, which doesn’t thrive on just one joke or idea, but that makes the most of its premise.
8

04-12-2014
Galaxy Quest (1999)
www.imdb.com/title/tt0177789/

Galaxy Quest should be celebrated for many different things. It’s Sigourney Weaver’s return to space and sciene-fiction in general, after being the star in the Alien and Ghostbusters franchise (granted, Alien: Resurrection (1997), the last part of the Alien movies, was released only two years earlier) and it’s cool to see her in a less serious space adventure. The latter is also to be celebrated: in a time where there were tons of sci-fi movies released that take themselves way too seriously, Galaxy Quest is a more than welcome alternative. Then there is the rest of the cast: Tim Allen will never be my favorite actor, but his washed-up actor performance is great. The smaller roles by Sam Rockwell and Rainn Wilson, Wilson in his first movie acting gig, are a lot of fun as well.

David Newman’s typical science-fiction family friendly score blasts through the opening credits as being part of the tv-series Galaxy Quest, a show that has aired many years ago but still has a massive Star Trek-like cult following. Jason Nesmith (Allen) was the commander of a spaceship called the NSEA Protector, his crew consisted of the sexy Gwen DeMarco (Weaver), Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman), Fred Kwan (Tony Shalhoub), Tommy Webber (Daryl Mitchell) and sixth guy Guy without-a-last-name (Sam Rockwell). As a Galaxy Quest convention is on its way, some actual aliens tell Nesmith about the faith of their planet, which is about to be destroyed by bad guy Sarris (Robin Sachs). The aliens, or Thermians, based their entire existence on the Galaxy Quest tv-show since they interpreted the broadcasts as actual historical documents. Everything on the tv-show is replicated and Nesmith and the crew have to stop Sarris from destroying the Thermians and the universe.

When one takes all the events and sequences with a grain of salt, Galaxy Quest is a wonderful movie. It definitely has its cheesy and corny moments but at the same time it’s very aware of this fact. There are tons of goofs and errors: why doesn’t the cast have friends outside of their colleagues, why do the aliens speak English with each other etc., but the extra dimension the story within the story brings is wonderful. The result is not only a very funny movie (especially Rockwell is hilarious), but an exciting space adventure as well. It’s one of the most convincing space parodies there is, which doesn’t thrive on just one joke or idea, but that makes the most of its premise.

8

@5 days ago with 2 notes
#galaxy quest #sigourney weaver #alien #ghostbusters #alien: resurrection #tim allen #sam rockwell #rainn wilson #david newman #star trek #alan rickman #tony shalhoub #daryl mitchell #robin sachs #enrico colantoni 
04-11-2014La Haine (1995)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113247/
La Haine is French director Mathieu Kassovitz’ most famous and celebrated movie. It is one of the first movies about the rough life in the banlieues of Paris: the title (which translates to ‘the hate’) refers to the hate that is felt between the police and the immigrant youth of the neighborhood.
The Jew Vinz (a young Vincent Cassel at the start of his career), the Arab Saïd (Saïd Taghmaoui) and the African Hubert (Hubert Koundé) are three youngsters living the hard life in the hoods of Paris. They don’t have much to live for except for each other and the general idea of getting respect from the other youth. Their friend Abdel gets beaten up during a police interrogation and the boys take much issue with this. Vinz finds a gun that was dropped by a cop during riots (during the opening credits actual footage of riots in Paris are shown, strong footage that sets the tone for a rough movie) and swears to take revenge if Abdel dies from his injuries.
And like that we follow a day in the life of the three boys. I haven’t seen many movies where the energy of a generations gets an outlet as in here. The emptiness and hopelessness of their lives is shot in beautiful black-and-white by Kassovitz and his cinematographer Pierre Aïm. The contrast the images show are in harmony with the contrast that breathe throughout the lives of the guys: they have got each other, best friends in bad times, but what is the point of it all really? The gun that Vinz finds (which isn’t shown during the movie) adds a specific kind of tension, one that gets it biggest impact in the last couple of scenes, which are predictable but impressive. But as the saying that the boys mutter goes, it’s not about the landing, it’s about the fall. The landing is good, but the fall is even better.
8

04-11-2014
La Haine (1995)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113247/

La Haine is French director Mathieu Kassovitz’ most famous and celebrated movie. It is one of the first movies about the rough life in the banlieues of Paris: the title (which translates to ‘the hate’) refers to the hate that is felt between the police and the immigrant youth of the neighborhood.

The Jew Vinz (a young Vincent Cassel at the start of his career), the Arab Saïd (Saïd Taghmaoui) and the African Hubert (Hubert Koundé) are three youngsters living the hard life in the hoods of Paris. They don’t have much to live for except for each other and the general idea of getting respect from the other youth. Their friend Abdel gets beaten up during a police interrogation and the boys take much issue with this. Vinz finds a gun that was dropped by a cop during riots (during the opening credits actual footage of riots in Paris are shown, strong footage that sets the tone for a rough movie) and swears to take revenge if Abdel dies from his injuries.

And like that we follow a day in the life of the three boys. I haven’t seen many movies where the energy of a generations gets an outlet as in here. The emptiness and hopelessness of their lives is shot in beautiful black-and-white by Kassovitz and his cinematographer Pierre Aïm. The contrast the images show are in harmony with the contrast that breathe throughout the lives of the guys: they have got each other, best friends in bad times, but what is the point of it all really? The gun that Vinz finds (which isn’t shown during the movie) adds a specific kind of tension, one that gets it biggest impact in the last couple of scenes, which are predictable but impressive. But as the saying that the boys mutter goes, it’s not about the landing, it’s about the fall. The landing is good, but the fall is even better.

8

@1 week ago with 1 note
#la haine #hate #mathieu kassovitz #vincent cassel #saïd taghmaoui #said taghmaoui #hubert kounde #hubert koundé #pierre aim #pierre aïm #cut killer #dj cut killer