10-10-2014Jodaeiye Nader Az Siminhttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt1832382/
Jodaeiye Nader Az Simin (English title: A Separation) is a groundbreaking movie directed by Iranian born Asghar Farhadi. Because of political turmoil, Iranian cinema has never fully had the chance to flourish until 1983, when the Farabi Cinema Foundation was given the task to reassemble the by-then current state of cinema,  which was disorganized because of years of political tensions. Since 1983, more and more Iranian movies have been released and appraised by fans and critics, but it was the release of Jodaeiye Nader Az Simin that had the biggest impact on the rest of the world. It was the first Iranian movie to win the Academy Award for best foreign language film, in 2012, and also won numerous other awards in the festival circuit.
In a confrontational opening scene, the titular Nader (Peyman Moaadi) and Simin (Leila Hatami) appear in court to settle Simin’s file for divorce. Simin does not want her to raise her daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi) in Tehran, where conditions have grown rather scary and not ideal to raise a child. Nader however feels that he needs to stay in Tehran, so he can take care of his father, who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. Their quarrel has unforeseen consequences when Nader loses his temper when he suspects the maid from stealing money.
Farhadi addresses a bunch of aspects that are mostly ignored by American or European (art house) cinema, most notably Alzheimer’s disease and its consequences and a realistic view of life in Iran, not intervened by bombs going off or fighter jets causing other kinds of mayhem. Instead, he presents us with a gripping story told in a suspenseful way western audiences have grown familiar with and are bound to appreciate. A Separation is exciting, with many underlying tensions and (sometimes tricky) plot twists. The message that remains at the end of the movie is one of hope and dependence on the children, who Farhadi shows as the only human beings that are fully to be trusted. There is hope in this movie, a poignant and beautiful elaborated kind of hope in the eyes of children. A drama set in a country most foreign for its western audience, but it’s all the more familiar.
8

10-10-2014
Jodaeiye Nader Az Simin
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1832382/

Jodaeiye Nader Az Simin (English title: A Separation) is a groundbreaking movie directed by Iranian born Asghar Farhadi. Because of political turmoil, Iranian cinema has never fully had the chance to flourish until 1983, when the Farabi Cinema Foundation was given the task to reassemble the by-then current state of cinema,  which was disorganized because of years of political tensions. Since 1983, more and more Iranian movies have been released and appraised by fans and critics, but it was the release of Jodaeiye Nader Az Simin that had the biggest impact on the rest of the world. It was the first Iranian movie to win the Academy Award for best foreign language film, in 2012, and also won numerous other awards in the festival circuit.

In a confrontational opening scene, the titular Nader (Peyman Moaadi) and Simin (Leila Hatami) appear in court to settle Simin’s file for divorce. Simin does not want her to raise her daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi) in Tehran, where conditions have grown rather scary and not ideal to raise a child. Nader however feels that he needs to stay in Tehran, so he can take care of his father, who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. Their quarrel has unforeseen consequences when Nader loses his temper when he suspects the maid from stealing money.

Farhadi addresses a bunch of aspects that are mostly ignored by American or European (art house) cinema, most notably Alzheimer’s disease and its consequences and a realistic view of life in Iran, not intervened by bombs going off or fighter jets causing other kinds of mayhem. Instead, he presents us with a gripping story told in a suspenseful way western audiences have grown familiar with and are bound to appreciate. A Separation is exciting, with many underlying tensions and (sometimes tricky) plot twists. The message that remains at the end of the movie is one of hope and dependence on the children, who Farhadi shows as the only human beings that are fully to be trusted. There is hope in this movie, a poignant and beautiful elaborated kind of hope in the eyes of children. A drama set in a country most foreign for its western audience, but it’s all the more familiar.

8

@4 hours ago
#jodaeiye nader az simin #a separation #asghar farhadi #peyman moaadi #leila hatami #sarina farhadi #shahab hosseyni #shahab hosseini #babak karimi #kimia hosseini 
10-09-2014Good Will Hunting (1997)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/
The story of Good Will Hunting was written by two of its stars still waiting for their big breakthrough which evidently came just shortly after: childhood friends Matt Damon and Ben Affleck. They promptly won an Academy Award for their screenplay in 1998 and their careers skyrocketed, although more so as actors than as (screen)writers.
Will Hunting (Damon) is a troubled young man living in South Boston. He works as a janitor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, even though he is incredibly smart (self taught) and has a photographic-like memory. When MIT’s mathematics teacher Gerald Lambeau (Stellan Skarsgård) writes down a difficult math problem for his students to solve, Will walks by and solves it with no apparent trouble. Gerald sees potential in Will, and sends him to Sean Maguire (Robin Williams), a psychology teacher who has a way to deal with hard-to-deal-with kids. The movie focuses mostly on the relationship between these two.
Sometimes it doesn’t really matter how believable a story is, as long as it’s recognizable and compelling. Luckily, director Gus Van Sant has a way for making movies like this, and the first 45 minutes or so of Good Will Hunting are thriving on these very aspects. Then you would expect there to come this scene which brings Good Will Hunting in the next level, characterwise or plotwise. Sadly though, it kind of stalls and fails to progress in a refreshing way. Basically everybody in Will’s life is getting into fights with him or about him, and this raises the question if he is really worth it? I don’t think so. Will comes across as a young man who doesn’t appreciate what anybody is doing for him and at the same time he is pushing these very people away. With his reasons, sure, but these reasons don’t show in the movie’s narrative and it leaves people guessing, having to rely mostly on Damon’s portrayal, which is OK at most, but is not good enough to have my sympathy at least. I had more sympathy for his just-as-troubled friend Chuckie (Affleck), who does seem to realise what’s going on in the world.
Good Will Hunting is still craftly filmmaking by Van Sant and his crew, who know how to make a solid movie with dramatic content. Van Sant makes sure that in the end every single detail is taken care of, leaving the audience fulfilled and heart warmed, but not challenged.
6

10-09-2014
Good Will Hunting (1997)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/

The story of Good Will Hunting was written by two of its stars still waiting for their big breakthrough which evidently came just shortly after: childhood friends Matt Damon and Ben Affleck. They promptly won an Academy Award for their screenplay in 1998 and their careers skyrocketed, although more so as actors than as (screen)writers.

Will Hunting (Damon) is a troubled young man living in South Boston. He works as a janitor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, even though he is incredibly smart (self taught) and has a photographic-like memory. When MIT’s mathematics teacher Gerald Lambeau (Stellan Skarsgård) writes down a difficult math problem for his students to solve, Will walks by and solves it with no apparent trouble. Gerald sees potential in Will, and sends him to Sean Maguire (Robin Williams), a psychology teacher who has a way to deal with hard-to-deal-with kids. The movie focuses mostly on the relationship between these two.

Sometimes it doesn’t really matter how believable a story is, as long as it’s recognizable and compelling. Luckily, director Gus Van Sant has a way for making movies like this, and the first 45 minutes or so of Good Will Hunting are thriving on these very aspects. Then you would expect there to come this scene which brings Good Will Hunting in the next level, characterwise or plotwise. Sadly though, it kind of stalls and fails to progress in a refreshing way. Basically everybody in Will’s life is getting into fights with him or about him, and this raises the question if he is really worth it? I don’t think so. Will comes across as a young man who doesn’t appreciate what anybody is doing for him and at the same time he is pushing these very people away. With his reasons, sure, but these reasons don’t show in the movie’s narrative and it leaves people guessing, having to rely mostly on Damon’s portrayal, which is OK at most, but is not good enough to have my sympathy at least. I had more sympathy for his just-as-troubled friend Chuckie (Affleck), who does seem to realise what’s going on in the world.

Good Will Hunting is still craftly filmmaking by Van Sant and his crew, who know how to make a solid movie with dramatic content. Van Sant makes sure that in the end every single detail is taken care of, leaving the audience fulfilled and heart warmed, but not challenged.

6

@1 day ago with 3 notes
#good will hunting #matt damon #ben affleck #stellan skarsgard #stellan skarsgård #robin williams #minnie driver #casey affleck #cole hauser #matt mercier #stephen trouskie 
10-08-2014The Great Escape (1963)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057115/
In the spring of 1943, a group of allied forces being held against their will in German prison camp Stalag Luft III conceived a major plan to escape this camp, which eventually occurred during the night of March 24-25, 1944. Director John Sturges biggest hit and arguably most ambitious movie was an adaptation of these events, with obviously a couple of compromises taken in order to make it more ‘watchable’. With an intriguing and gripping story like this, and with Elmer Bernstein as composer, Daniel L. Fapp as cinematographer and a range of the most popular actors of the time, The Great Escape could never have failed.
German forces have spent much resources on hunting down and capturing some of Allied prisoners of war that have been most determined to plan an escape every single time they have been captured before. Under the direction of ‘Big X’ Roger Bartlett (Richard Attenborough), the group conceives a grand plan to let more than 200 prisoners escape.
Despite its running time of 172 minutes, Sturges manages by use of skillfully made cinema to never become dull. From the moment the prisoners arrive until the final moments of their escape, The Great Escape is a thrilling ride. Whereas in the present a filmmaker would focus almost solely on the excitement a story like this would bring, Sturges has an eye for character development without stigmatizing anybody. All of the characters are fascinating to see working on their own small task for the bigger whole, which gives Sturges the opportunity to alternate deftly between them to keep the pace going, not being afraid to add a joke or two in the process.
The Great Escape is classic war/action movie. It is a beautiful explanation of finding hope in the most tormenting of situations, of trying to stay rational instead of emotional, evoking the most emotional of results. There is almost nothing wrong with this movie: from casting to setting, from production design to music, everything is worked out in perfect detail.
9

10-08-2014
The Great Escape (1963)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057115/

In the spring of 1943, a group of allied forces being held against their will in German prison camp Stalag Luft III conceived a major plan to escape this camp, which eventually occurred during the night of March 24-25, 1944. Director John Sturges biggest hit and arguably most ambitious movie was an adaptation of these events, with obviously a couple of compromises taken in order to make it more ‘watchable’. With an intriguing and gripping story like this, and with Elmer Bernstein as composer, Daniel L. Fapp as cinematographer and a range of the most popular actors of the time, The Great Escape could never have failed.

German forces have spent much resources on hunting down and capturing some of Allied prisoners of war that have been most determined to plan an escape every single time they have been captured before. Under the direction of ‘Big X’ Roger Bartlett (Richard Attenborough), the group conceives a grand plan to let more than 200 prisoners escape.

Despite its running time of 172 minutes, Sturges manages by use of skillfully made cinema to never become dull. From the moment the prisoners arrive until the final moments of their escape, The Great Escape is a thrilling ride. Whereas in the present a filmmaker would focus almost solely on the excitement a story like this would bring, Sturges has an eye for character development without stigmatizing anybody. All of the characters are fascinating to see working on their own small task for the bigger whole, which gives Sturges the opportunity to alternate deftly between them to keep the pace going, not being afraid to add a joke or two in the process.

The Great Escape is classic war/action movie. It is a beautiful explanation of finding hope in the most tormenting of situations, of trying to stay rational instead of emotional, evoking the most emotional of results. There is almost nothing wrong with this movie: from casting to setting, from production design to music, everything is worked out in perfect detail.

9

@2 days ago
#the great escape #john sturges #elmer bernstein #daniel l. frapp #richard attenborough #steve mcqueen #james garner #james donald #charles bronson #donald pleasence #james coburn #david mccallum #gordon jackson #john leyton #nigel stock #jud taylor 
10-07-2014Illégal (2010)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1503777/
Illégal is the second feature film directed by Belgian filmmaker Olivier Masset-Depasse. It was received quite well, especially in Belgium, where it was nominated for eight Magritte Awards in 2010. It tackles the controversial subjects of immigration and the practices of immigration officers, although Masset-Depasse’s presentation of the events is highly unnuanced, sensational and not entirely based on facts.
The story follows a couple of weeks in the life of Tania (Anne Coesens, the director’s wife). She is a Belarusian woman living illegally in the southern parts of Belgium with her son Ivan (Alexandre Gontcharov). She has secretly lived in Belgium for eight years without getting deported, but when she is speaking Russian with her son she gets arrested and sent to a detention center, where she desperately tries to find a solution to her problems.
Masset-Depasse is clearly influenced by the work of the Dardenne-brothers, also born and raised in the French-speaking parts of Belgium. By constantly focusing the camera on his leading actress, he tries to realise a realistic feeling that will only strengthen the sympathy of his audience. Granted, this approach works alright, but at no point does Masset-Depasse reaches that point of poignant and heartfelt cinema that the Dardenne-brothers flourish in. It is still only Masset-Depasse’s second feature film and he has lots of potential to get better however, so there’s no hope lost.
Although the subject of this movie is relevant and gives the opportunity to evoke discussions, Masset-Depasse presents his story in a black-and-white way. Immigrants are all good and immigration officers are all bad. A risky subject with a disappointing elaboration.
6

10-07-2014
Illégal (2010)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1503777/

Illégal is the second feature film directed by Belgian filmmaker Olivier Masset-Depasse. It was received quite well, especially in Belgium, where it was nominated for eight Magritte Awards in 2010. It tackles the controversial subjects of immigration and the practices of immigration officers, although Masset-Depasse’s presentation of the events is highly unnuanced, sensational and not entirely based on facts.

The story follows a couple of weeks in the life of Tania (Anne Coesens, the director’s wife). She is a Belarusian woman living illegally in the southern parts of Belgium with her son Ivan (Alexandre Gontcharov). She has secretly lived in Belgium for eight years without getting deported, but when she is speaking Russian with her son she gets arrested and sent to a detention center, where she desperately tries to find a solution to her problems.

Masset-Depasse is clearly influenced by the work of the Dardenne-brothers, also born and raised in the French-speaking parts of Belgium. By constantly focusing the camera on his leading actress, he tries to realise a realistic feeling that will only strengthen the sympathy of his audience. Granted, this approach works alright, but at no point does Masset-Depasse reaches that point of poignant and heartfelt cinema that the Dardenne-brothers flourish in. It is still only Masset-Depasse’s second feature film and he has lots of potential to get better however, so there’s no hope lost.

Although the subject of this movie is relevant and gives the opportunity to evoke discussions, Masset-Depasse presents his story in a black-and-white way. Immigrants are all good and immigration officers are all bad. A risky subject with a disappointing elaboration.

6

@3 days ago
#illégal #illegal #olivier masset-depasse #anne coesens #alexandre gontcharov #luc dardenne #jean-pierre dardenne 
10-09-2014Redacted (2007)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0937237/
Brian De Palma gets political yet again with this skilfully crafted anti-war movie called Redacted. It is much more in-your-face than his other political movies, Greetings (1968) - more a big satirical joke - and Casualties Of War (1989) - which has a comparable starting point but is completely different in approach. Despite being a financial failure, Redacted was received rather well at the festival circuit.
Redacted is based on the Mahmudiyah killings in Iraq in 2006, when U.S. Army soldiers raped a young Iraqi girl in her house, killing her and her family afterwards. The fictionalised Angel Salazar (Izzy Diaz) documents his military operations with his camcorder, in order to make a documentary film which he can use to enroll in film school. At the same time, a couple of French documentarians are making their own documentary, also recording the actions of Salazar and his crew. They document the soldiers while they are on duty guarding a bridge, which provides some interesting cinema.
Besides by camcorder and by documentary filmmakers, De Palma also uses news flashes, video blogs and surveillance footage to tell the story, which goes far beyond just telling and ventures into some of the most disturbing, frustrating and upsetting anti-war propaganda I have seen in a long time. De Palma does not shy away from the ugly sides of the war or cinema, even if it is fictionalised and at times presented too unbelievable because of staging and acting issues.
This is far from a Hollywood-action flick, as Salazar explains at the beginning of the movie. It is also not a commie rendition of the mission, as one of his colleagues puts it. Redacted is a shocking movie, a surprising movie by suspense artist De Palma, who combines his abilities to create tension and to tell a compelling story to full poignant effect.
8

10-09-2014
Redacted (2007)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0937237/

Brian De Palma gets political yet again with this skilfully crafted anti-war movie called Redacted. It is much more in-your-face than his other political movies, Greetings (1968) - more a big satirical joke - and Casualties Of War (1989) - which has a comparable starting point but is completely different in approach. Despite being a financial failure, Redacted was received rather well at the festival circuit.

Redacted is based on the Mahmudiyah killings in Iraq in 2006, when U.S. Army soldiers raped a young Iraqi girl in her house, killing her and her family afterwards. The fictionalised Angel Salazar (Izzy Diaz) documents his military operations with his camcorder, in order to make a documentary film which he can use to enroll in film school. At the same time, a couple of French documentarians are making their own documentary, also recording the actions of Salazar and his crew. They document the soldiers while they are on duty guarding a bridge, which provides some interesting cinema.

Besides by camcorder and by documentary filmmakers, De Palma also uses news flashes, video blogs and surveillance footage to tell the story, which goes far beyond just telling and ventures into some of the most disturbing, frustrating and upsetting anti-war propaganda I have seen in a long time. De Palma does not shy away from the ugly sides of the war or cinema, even if it is fictionalised and at times presented too unbelievable because of staging and acting issues.

This is far from a Hollywood-action flick, as Salazar explains at the beginning of the movie. It is also not a commie rendition of the mission, as one of his colleagues puts it. Redacted is a shocking movie, a surprising movie by suspense artist De Palma, who combines his abilities to create tension and to tell a compelling story to full poignant effect.

8

@8 hours ago
#brian de palma #redacted #greetings #casualties of war #izzy diaz #rob devaney #ty jones #anas wellman #mike figueroa #kel o'neill #patrick carroll #daniel stewart sherman 
10-08-2014Repo Man (1984)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087995/
If there is anything to learn from Alex Cox’ debut feature film Repo Man, it has to be that not every slightly bigger budgeted 80s cult movie is instantly fun or from the so-bad-it’s-good category. Repo Man is a disappointing effort, failing to achieve that single thing that’s most important in a movie like this: to be funny.
Cox’ own plot follows the adventures of young punk Otto (Emilio Estevez), who, after his best friend cheated on him with his girlfriend and after he got fired from his job at the supermarket, walks aimlessly down the street while he gets approached by a repo man who could use an extra hand. Cox helps repo man Bud (Harry Dean Stanton) out and lands a job at the agency as a result. Things go alright for a while, but when a mysterious car with some kind of mysterious inflammable alien-stuff is his next target, things go seriously wrong.
Repo Man is a big mess. Apart from the plot being beyond nonsensical and lacking any kind of interesting progress for the first hour or so, it consists mostly of empty dialogues delivered by an uninspired cast. However, for what Repo Man is trying to be - easy and silly entertainment for older kids - this wouldn’t necessarily have proved to be a big problem, but because of Cox’ bleak directing and messy presentation of his story, Repo Man disappoints. Even for 80s cult entertainment standards that is.
Repo Man definitely has its moments though: the dry package design is fun and despite the hollow dialogues, almost every single one of them contains a memorable one-liner. And the ending is basically the only part that truly does justice to the kind of movie that Repo Man attempts to be.
5

10-08-2014
Repo Man (1984)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087995/

If there is anything to learn from Alex Cox’ debut feature film Repo Man, it has to be that not every slightly bigger budgeted 80s cult movie is instantly fun or from the so-bad-it’s-good category. Repo Man is a disappointing effort, failing to achieve that single thing that’s most important in a movie like this: to be funny.

Cox’ own plot follows the adventures of young punk Otto (Emilio Estevez), who, after his best friend cheated on him with his girlfriend and after he got fired from his job at the supermarket, walks aimlessly down the street while he gets approached by a repo man who could use an extra hand. Cox helps repo man Bud (Harry Dean Stanton) out and lands a job at the agency as a result. Things go alright for a while, but when a mysterious car with some kind of mysterious inflammable alien-stuff is his next target, things go seriously wrong.

Repo Man is a big mess. Apart from the plot being beyond nonsensical and lacking any kind of interesting progress for the first hour or so, it consists mostly of empty dialogues delivered by an uninspired cast. However, for what Repo Man is trying to be - easy and silly entertainment for older kids - this wouldn’t necessarily have proved to be a big problem, but because of Cox’ bleak directing and messy presentation of his story, Repo Man disappoints. Even for 80s cult entertainment standards that is.

Repo Man definitely has its moments though: the dry package design is fun and despite the hollow dialogues, almost every single one of them contains a memorable one-liner. And the ending is basically the only part that truly does justice to the kind of movie that Repo Man attempts to be.

5

@1 day ago
#alex cox #repo man #emilio estevez #harry dean stanton #tracey walter #olivia barash #sy richardson #susan barnes #fox harris #tom finnegan #del zamora #eddie velez #miguel sandoval #vonetta mcgee #zander schloss #circle jerks 
10-07-2014Basic Instinct (1992)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0103772/
Dutchman Paul Verhoeven’s erotic thriller Basic Instinct turned out to be one of his financially most successful English-spoken movies. Joe Eszterhas’ plot follows police detective Nick Curran (Michael Douglas) investigating the murder of former rock-n-roll musician Johnny Boz (Bill Cable). Boz’ girlfriend Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone) is immediatly one of the prime-suspects, especially after Nick and his team find out that the murder is identical as Tramell has written down in one of her novels. An intriguing game of sensual proportions ensues, while Nick retorts back to alcohol and cigarettes.
Basic Instinct is a fairly exciting yet formulaic thriller. Verhoeven doesn’t shy away from Hitchcockian conventions, a pretty one-dimensional plot and other run-of-the-mill extravaganzas like that one cool car chase or the beat down protagonist (luckily a role Douglas is familiar with). What’s important though, is that Basic Instinct is lively and expertly shot, with Jerry Goldsmith’s score adding to the tension.
Besides that, Basic Instinct naturally is heavily reliant on its sexually loaded scenes and constant erotic undertones. Although it will not cause you to look at your screen with your hands in your pants, it does add a little extra. It’s this dirty little thrill that makes it more than just the average thriller, since without it Basic Instinct would not stand out. It’s stylish and slick, a little empty, but cool.
8

10-07-2014
Basic Instinct (1992)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0103772/

Dutchman Paul Verhoeven’s erotic thriller Basic Instinct turned out to be one of his financially most successful English-spoken movies. Joe Eszterhas’ plot follows police detective Nick Curran (Michael Douglas) investigating the murder of former rock-n-roll musician Johnny Boz (Bill Cable). Boz’ girlfriend Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone) is immediatly one of the prime-suspects, especially after Nick and his team find out that the murder is identical as Tramell has written down in one of her novels. An intriguing game of sensual proportions ensues, while Nick retorts back to alcohol and cigarettes.

Basic Instinct is a fairly exciting yet formulaic thriller. Verhoeven doesn’t shy away from Hitchcockian conventions, a pretty one-dimensional plot and other run-of-the-mill extravaganzas like that one cool car chase or the beat down protagonist (luckily a role Douglas is familiar with). What’s important though, is that Basic Instinct is lively and expertly shot, with Jerry Goldsmith’s score adding to the tension.

Besides that, Basic Instinct naturally is heavily reliant on its sexually loaded scenes and constant erotic undertones. Although it will not cause you to look at your screen with your hands in your pants, it does add a little extra. It’s this dirty little thrill that makes it more than just the average thriller, since without it Basic Instinct would not stand out. It’s stylish and slick, a little empty, but cool.

8

@2 days ago
#paul verhoeven #basic instinct #joe eszterhas #michael douglas #bill cable #sharon stone #jerry goldsmith #george dzundza #jeanne tripplehorn #denis arndt #leilani sarelle #bruce a. young #wayne knight #daniel von bargen #dorothy malone #mary pat gleason 
10-06-2014Inferno (1980)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080923/
The Three Mothers-trilogy by Dario Argento consists of Suspiria (1977), Inferno and La Terza Madre (or The Mother Of Tears, 2007). The three mothers are sisters, old witches originating from the 11th century.
Inferno deals with the second of these mothers: Mater Tenebrarum, or the Mother of Darkness, who kind of lives in an old building in New York City where the young Rose Elliott (Irene Miracle) is one of the tenants. After she reads a book called The Three Mothers, she discovers the secret of the three actual mothers, who inhabit houses in Rome, Freiburg and New York. After Rose finds out, she gets caught by a mysterious ghost-like figure, after which things get awry for other people involved in her life. It is up to her brother Mark (Leigh McCloskey) to solve the scary mystery.
The start of the movie is just as confusing as the rest of it. Argento’s plot (his screenwriting abilities have never been his strongest point) does not make much sense at all. What is actually happening? There is a book and some ghosts in three random cities, but why? One would expect Argento to answer some questions at the end at least, but alas, things remain a mystery. It’s style-over-substance anyway, and since Argento knows how to set a mood (in this movie accompanied on many aspects by Mario Bava, who even directed some scenes when Argento was bedridden), Inferno is still a blast to watch. The special effects, the murder-scenes, the little unnerving sequences with a girl being hanged and some kind of lizard eating a butterfly, the score and especially the typical use of warm colours and pulsating lights make for a nice and one of the better Giallo-films. Argento knows how to make baroque bombastic pleasure and shows he masters his skill, and although Inferno is not as bombastic as the vivid Suspiria, it is still a wildly entertaining movie.
7

10-06-2014
Inferno (1980)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080923/

The Three Mothers-trilogy by Dario Argento consists of Suspiria (1977), Inferno and La Terza Madre (or The Mother Of Tears, 2007). The three mothers are sisters, old witches originating from the 11th century.

Inferno deals with the second of these mothers: Mater Tenebrarum, or the Mother of Darkness, who kind of lives in an old building in New York City where the young Rose Elliott (Irene Miracle) is one of the tenants. After she reads a book called The Three Mothers, she discovers the secret of the three actual mothers, who inhabit houses in Rome, Freiburg and New York. After Rose finds out, she gets caught by a mysterious ghost-like figure, after which things get awry for other people involved in her life. It is up to her brother Mark (Leigh McCloskey) to solve the scary mystery.

The start of the movie is just as confusing as the rest of it. Argento’s plot (his screenwriting abilities have never been his strongest point) does not make much sense at all. What is actually happening? There is a book and some ghosts in three random cities, but why? One would expect Argento to answer some questions at the end at least, but alas, things remain a mystery. It’s style-over-substance anyway, and since Argento knows how to set a mood (in this movie accompanied on many aspects by Mario Bava, who even directed some scenes when Argento was bedridden), Inferno is still a blast to watch. The special effects, the murder-scenes, the little unnerving sequences with a girl being hanged and some kind of lizard eating a butterfly, the score and especially the typical use of warm colours and pulsating lights make for a nice and one of the better Giallo-films. Argento knows how to make baroque bombastic pleasure and shows he masters his skill, and although Inferno is not as bombastic as the vivid Suspiria, it is still a wildly entertaining movie.

7

@4 days ago with 2 notes
#the three mothers #dario argento #suspiria #inferno #la terza madre #the mother of tears #irene miracle #leigh mccloskey #alida valli #ania pieroni #eleonora giorgi #daria nicolodi #sacha pitoeff #sacha pitoëff